Kaleka Keys – Nitenge featuring KatOyo A Ayoo




Victor Kaleka, better known as “Kaleka Keys”, is a keyboard player/pianist, composer, song writer and performing artist born in Kenya and based in Nairobi. His music cuts across the genres of Afro- Jazz, Gospel music and R&B.

His music career started in 2012 after high school when he began working with different bands. He grew fast within the music industry through hard work, motivation and discipline. He has performed in events and festivals in Kenya such as Koroga Festival, Kwetu festival, Cake Festival and many others.

He has worked with some of Kenya’s popular artists like Juliani and LJ Maasai. Currently, he is playing for an artist called Kidum Kibido who is well recognized internationally.
Among the artists who inspire him are; Brian Culbertson, Chick Korea, Cory Henry, Richard Bona, Shawn Martin and George Duke. His vision is to bring African Fused Jazz with a different feel.

Everything he knows is self-taught. He trained himself to play the keyboard by ear, listening to other musicians and practicing with YouTube tutorials.

Kaleka Keys is currently working on his first Album called “Flower Garden”. He has released one Single out ‘Blind Love – Official Music Video’

Kaleka Keys
Click for more about Kaleka Keys



 

Gogo Simo, a unique East African sound




Gogo Simo is a seven piece band that plays almost every genre of music. They have recorded two albums titled Gogo Simo and Heshimu respectively. They completed their third album ‘UPAWA; which was launched on 2nd September, 2011. Gogo Simo is without a doubt the best band in Kenya.

They perform 5 days a week every week and are largely popular for entertaining at one of the leading TV shows ‘Churchill Live’. They entertain age groups from 25 to 85. The band consists of bass guitar, keyboards, drums, saxophones, percussion and female lead voice. Almost all the band members are vocalists in their own right. Once you’ve heard Gogo Simo, you keep coming back for more.

Band Members

1. Artist/1stKeyboard/Composer/CEO/Producer/Managing/Music Director: James Gogo

2.Keyboards/Vocals: Mike O W Jozee

3.Drums/Vocals: Mechack Niyo

4.Bass: Moses Karanja

5.Band leader/Saxophone/Vocals: Noah Saha

6.Assistant Band leader/Lead Guitar: David N Omamu

7.BGVs/Lead Vocals:Ruth Muhonja

 
Hometown
Mombasa, Kenya
General Manager
James Gogo
Press contact
+254 728 025 272
Booking agent
+254 728 025 272

Gogo Simo on Facebook

Gogo Simo
Click here to visit Gogo Simo on the web



Good luck SuRie in the Eurovision Song Contest


She’s a fan of Jeff Buckley who once harboured dreams of signing for Bella Union. So, can this dance diva succeed where Blue and Bonnie Tyler faltered?

“Welcome to my hooooome,” SuRie deadpans, before bursting into laughter. We are meeting ahead of the Eurovision final in Lisbon, and the UK’s contestant is perched on a velvet-upholstered chair in the opulent Portuguese embassy in London. She throws herself into the role of tour guide with aplomb. “If you see this tapestry,” she says, gesturing to a floor-to-ceiling artwork of a fleet of ships, “it depicts a voyage from Lisbon to the UK, and now I’m doing the reverse. I think there’s a lovely link.”

Today, SuRie, 29, is wearing roomy black athleisure; her candyfloss-coloured hair is cut into a short crop like Katy Perry’s. In the past her music has skewed slightly alternative, and pre-Eurovision she released a heartfelt piano-led cover of Jeff Buckley’s Lover, You Should’ve Come Over. But her current song, Storm, flips that 180 degrees: it’s a distillation of EDM and 90s dance that feels slightly dated but has the nefarious sticking power of an ad jingle. “Storms don’t last for ever,” SuRie belts out stagily, bringing to mind all those divas who have sung of making it through the rain to welcome a new day.

“It means a lot to me,” she says of her song. “I need a reminder sometimes to keep my chin up and keep perspective. If we come together, concentrating on love and positivity, we can get through it all.”

SuRie’s hope is that her posi-pop earworm will be enough to give the UK its first Eurovision win since Katrina and the Waves’ Love Shine a Light back in 1997. Even the most dedicated fan of the contest would find it hard to deny that the UK has dropped the ball in recent years, with unmemorable entries from Blue, Bonnie Tyler and last year’s balladeer, Lucie Jones. “I don’t know what the problem is,” SuRie says. “But I hope to be a small cog in that wheel of trying to improve the reputation.”


10 Traits That Prove You Were Born to Be a Musician



It’s not a secret that musician brains are a little different from “normal” brains. As with any skill or profession, most of it can be learned, but certain things that you need to be a good musician come from nature, not nurture.

Do you show the symptoms of musicianship? Here are 10 established correlations.

1. You’re naturally curious

That door in your apartment that’s nailed shut? You’ve got to know what’s behind it. That trail through the woods that you see when you’re riding the bus? Sooner or later, you’ll get off a stop early to explore it. What happens when you put a bunch of big ball bearings on piano strings? You’re just the person to find out. Curiosity, exploration, and experimentation are bread and butter for musicians.

2. You’re not slowed down by rejection

Like salespeople, musicians have to hear “no” on a regular basis. No matter how great your act is, it won’t be right for every gig or every venue. No matter how talented you are, you’ll lose opportunities to someone who got there just a little sooner, someone who knows someone, or someone who sounds a little bit more like that club owner’s favorite artist. Although these rejections always sting, they also don’t deter you. You believe in your own voice and will keep working until it’s heard.

3. You have systems and rules for yourself and your surroundings

If musicians have a hard time accepting external structures, we tend to be eager to impose rules and restrictions of our own making. Musicians know intuitively what the right thing is. We’re likely to have strong opinions about domestic issues like dishwashing, laundry, and home organization.

A musician might have a no-eating rule in his or her car, or insist that all T-shirts have to be hung up rather than folded. This sense of correct practice is what builds the conventions and habits that form an artist’s personal style.

4. You’re reasonable in your dealings with others

Musicianship takes a lot of teamwork. You collaborate with bandmates, session players, studio staff, live sound techs, and (of course) your audience. You might be the brightest light in the room, but it’s highly unlikely that you’re the biggest diva.

If someone has unreasonable expectations or inflexible demands, it’s not you. Whether this skill is learned through your art, or whether your natural talents led you to become a performer, you’re always more likely to be peacemaker and negotiator than an instigator.

5. You don’t stay down for long

Ever work in the studio all day and hate the result? Ever lose a bandmate right before a series of shows? If you tackle anything passionately, you’ll have lots of little triumphs and little disappointments along the way. But if you’re moping on Monday, you’ll be back in the studio or on the stage on Tuesday. You don’t let a bad mood engulf you and color what you’re trying to do.

6. You have a lot of empathy

What makes a good songwriter? It’s not just wordsmithing – it’s empathy. How many great songs have been written about hardworking people crushed under some harsh system? Songwriters feel for others, so much so that they write songs from others’ points of view. This is why you’ll see so many musicians who have day jobs in caring professions, particularly helping the disabled in schools or job-coaching environments.

7. You get along well with animals

That empathy also translates into a love for animals. Tons of musicians have pets and many are animal lovers. Quite a few are animal rights activists. I challenge anyone to think about Sarah McLachlan without visualizing that ad with the sad puppies and hearing “In the Arms of an Angel.”You probably cried, too, even if you’re in a nasty punk band and have a safety pin through your nose.

8. You like science fiction books and movies

The real world? Boring. Artistic types like to create new worlds and explore worlds created by others. We like sci-fi and fantasy for this reason, and enjoy shows in which new viewers would be completely lost because they don’t understand the complex backstory.

Of course, since we’re veterans of creating things ourselves, we also tend to deconstruct scripts, calling out predictable lines that actors are about to utter. We like making fun of bad special effects, clunky direction, and bad acting.

9. You like fixing and building things

Music is a hands-on field, made to order for people who hate lectures and chalkboard notes and want to just jump in and do it. That’s why so many musicians modify their instruments, customize their band vans, and build all sorts of hacks in the studio or rehearsal space. A lot of us are drawn to carpentry, computers, electronics, and mechanics. We’re not afraid to rip things apart and see what makes them tick.

10. You laugh a lot

News cycle got you down? We’re all stuck on planet Earth, dealing with violent extremism, climate threats, and atrocious fast food. And we all have two weapons to battle the blues: art and humor.

Musicians are some of the funniest people you’ll meet, especially in groups. Ride to a show with any band that’s been together for a while, and you’ll be spitting out your drink. It’s a kind of amazing, vulgar, politically incorrect banter that screenwriters rarely get right. If we could just record chunks of that, we’d have enough material for a stand-up routine… or the lyrics to our next album.

Jesse Sterling Harrison is an author, recording artist, and part-time farmer. He lives in Massachusetts with his wife, three daughters, and a herd of ducks.


How to Write Songs That Get Stuck in People’s Heads



If you’ve seen Easy A, you probably remember the scene where Emma Stone receives a card that plays Natasha Bedingfield’s “Pocketful of Sunshine” and how Stone’s character hates the song – at first. Flash forward to a few days later, and she can’t stop singing it.

There are songs that we can’t stand, yet can’t get out of our heads. There are also songs that we love and feel addicted to. For whatever reason, songs get lodged in our brains – and often stay there for a maddeningly long time.

Labled “earworms” by the scientific community, it’s been suggested that these ditties hang around longer in musicians’ minds than non-musicians’. What makes a song have such a huge impact on our brains? Below, we’ll run through the four main components of creating a catchy song that you can’t get out of your head, even if you want to. 

But first, let’s revisit that clip of Emma Stone and “Pocketful of Sunshine” as a prime example of earworm invasion:

1. Song structure

There are a variety of song structures often used in today’s popular music. Formats such as ABABCB (A = verse, B = chorus, C = bridge or solo) and AABA (A = verse and B = bridge) are very common and easy for listeners to remember.

While songs don’t necessarily have to follow any specific layout, catchy songs generally tend to follow one of the more common structures listed above or a variation of some sort. Finding the right balance between meeting listeners’ expectations and throwing in something surprising is a surefire way to create an earworm.

2. Lyrics

In today’s music market, many fantastic songwriters write elaborate lyrics. That said, the majority of catchy songs feature smaller amounts of words or words that are easy to remember, and often repeat portions (see ABABCB above), which, in turn, create a difficult song to get out of your head.

When the focus is on the song’s hook and chorus, keeping the fancy lyrics for the verses will lure listeners in and leave them humming the most memorable parts throughout the day.

3. Chord progressions and melodies

There are certain progressions that create addictive songs. Similar to song structure, catchy chord progressions must balance expectations and artistic expression. By tying the simplicity of commonality to the unexpected, listeners are drawn into the comfort of what they know and the excitement of what lies ahead.

Building off the chord progressions, the melody is usually what we retain in our heads. A catchy melody is generally upbeat, though there are some hauntingly beautiful melancholy melodies out there as well. Even the most irritating songs have a well-written line that our minds can’t escape. A melody that is both interesting and recognizable is a key component of a catchy song.

4. Production quality

This last category is dependent on what exactly you do in the music industry. Are you writing for other artists? If so, the production quality may be out of your hands. If you’re in charge of the production of your song, however, this absolutely contributes to its popularity. Though there’s an audience for less polished recordings, not many people want to listen to a poorly recorded album version of a song that sounds like a demoIn order to have a catchy song that appeals to the masses, the production quality must be high. This isn’t to say that someone who can’t afford to record in a professional studio hasn’t written a catchy song, but a high-quality recording of the song will open up a larger market and make it more likely to receive favorable reviews and airplay.

Whether it’s a song you love or can’t stand, you have to admit there’s great science behind songwriting. Creating something that piques a large audience’s interest, even those who consider it a guilty pleasure, is a tough task to take on. For a fun exercise, try figuring out what makes that song you can’t get out of your head so addictive. If you’re a songwriter, you could even adapt that writing format and see what you come up with.

What do you think makes a catchy song? Let us know in the comments below!

Kathleen Parrish is a singer and songwriter from Seattle, WA. While she specializes in lyrics, she enjoys writing short stories, poetry, and journalism. For more information, please visit www.kathleenparrish.com.


Listen to the song, close your eyes and feel the waves of your soul -The Last Eclipse



My Surreal Music  welcomes you in a fusion of classic and electronic sounds.  Are you ready to get entranced in a fantasy atmosphere, experiencing darkness, love and desire? Sometimes in life we experience a partial eclipse or a total eclipse of the heart. I hope the eclipse can be also a rebirth for people who are searching and desire to find themselves.




The latest track from Deena Ade – Melo



Deena Ade is an alternative artist, who has been described as raw and powerful in her vocal and lyrical delivery. Reminiscent of the Eryka Badu and late Amy Winehouse to name a few. 

Melo Produced THABEATSMITH is the official single from her debut project ‘The Cries Of My Subconscious’

She explores a world of an Alpha female, who’s one desire is to capture the attention and love of another. Miss SLUTWALK herself proves once again to go against the grain in this song. Entwining her sultry vocals with her words of seduction.

Born Medina Agboluaje, the first of four children, music has been a substantial goal of Medina since the age of eight. As a child Medina performed around London for a local charity, which eventually led to performing for the late Papa Madiba in this state visit to London. Over twelve years later Medina can be found performing weekly in London’s hottest underground spots.

Having found much comfort in the training received by mentors such Beats by Sarz and other industry power players, Deena is now ready to face the music industry with the intensity she believes it is lacking. Using a name to define her sound and style can be quite daunting, but under the fabric of her stage performances lies a blueprint of influences. For example Amy Winehouse, Asa, Beyonce, Wizkid, Fela Kuti. 

Deena Ade is currently releasing a song a month for a year which will be followed up by an LP project, set to be released in November titled “THE FEMINIST”. As her talents and fan base continues to grow, she emphasises on people not to over look as her, as she is the future of the African Music Industry. As she says ” It doesn’t matter what people say, as long as they like my music’. 

 


5 Songs I Listen To For Just One Line – Straight to my head like the first cigarette of the day


Go to the profile of Jeff Gorra

One line is all it takes. Sometimes, it’s just one word.

It happened to me this morning. “Jeff, how long have you been standing there in that same spot? You looked so focused, but content.” This was the first greeting I received at my office today. It’s because I was thumbing through the song list on my phone like I was throwing a discus, trying to find the one song I needed to hear in that moment — all for one line. It was “The Bones of You” by Elbow.

“When out of a doorway
The tentacles stretch of a song that I know
And the world moves in slow-mo
Straight to my head like the first cigarette of the day….

… and I dealt with this years ago
I took a hammer to every memento
But image on image like beads on a rosary
Pulled through my head as the music takes hold”

Had to have it.

At this point, I had not had my morning coffee yet so the ‘The Bones of You” was to go straight to my head like the first cigarette of the day. Consider it a healthy hit.

Six years ago, I had no idea who Elbow was. I had Palladia on in my living room and they airing a Glastonbury Festival special. Elbow happened to be performing. I was in the process of fixing a front door when all of sudden I whipped my head around at the sound of Guy Garvey’s voice. That’s just it — I’m talking about a particular line of song here, but much of the gravitation has to do with the singer’s delivery. Garvey took a deep breath, dug deep, and fired out … “And IIIIIII dealt with this years ago….”

Dealt with this years ago? What does that mean? A recurring problem? A beautiful persistence? I still don’t know, but I am continually fascinated by that line and how it connects back to the verse that precedes it (quoted above). It strings together the song, the passion and a “high” all through word placement and it’s position within the composition. Garvey recognizes that then shoots it into the sky like a flaming arrow.

There are a few songs like this for me. It’s like having a shiny pair of sneakers right in front of you, but you have to wear your worn-out Nike’s in the closet because they are reliable and give you a stability to take on the day like no other pair. It’s trust, but it’s also a calibration. That one line or word matches what you feel in that moment. It gives you an injection of exactly what you need to get right. It’s an understanding.

With that in mind, here are my five. What are yours?

“Hard to Imagine” by: Pearl Jam

Line — “…I hope this works somehow.” Disclaimer — this is one of my favorite songs in the universe. But at the last chorus, Eddie Vedder changes one line. Gone is the floating lone “somehow.” Three words are added to the front in …”I hope this works.” It’s so strong and vulnerable at the same time, and I feel it encapsulates the movement of the entire song.

“Ramble” by: Silverchair

Line — “And the ocean of time.” The ocean of time? I’ve never heard anyone make that analogy before, but Daniel Johns does it perfectly. This is such a melodic (and rare) song to begin with. The verses are like smooth waves and this is the 4th swell. The ironic thing is the line before this reads “in the dark of my mind.” Whoa. Intense. But “and the ocean of time” balances it out. What a mirage. An ocean of time — it could be anything.

 

“Overjoyed” by: Stevie Wonder

Word — “Over”. This is a unique one because it does not center around a particular moment in the song. I’m not eagerly anticipating the 1:47 mark. The word “over” is used 13 times throughout the 3 minute, 43 second song and I’m constantly focused on it. Over — time, over — dreams, over — hearts, over — love, over — me, over — you, over-joyed. The genius that is Stevie Wonder uses the word “over” to guide the entire journey. He stresses the two-syllables each time and leverages it to send you on your way through the next topic. It’s like one of those toys that you open up where there’s a smaller version of the exact toy inside. Then you do it again and again until you find there are about 12 renditions of the same figure all contained in one. “Overjoyed” has a bunch of tiny “overs” all layered into the main figure, which is overjoyed. Off topic — but this also song reminds me of my mom who always encourages me to continuing writing pieces like this.

“All Night Thing” by: Temple of the Dog/Chris Cornell

Line —“I do not know… what’s going on?” It’s the pause between “know” and “what’s.” These lyrics soar above an organ and for me, it’s multi-dimensional. Cornell always had an uncanny ability to have profound lyrics that were deep and could serve as your friend. If I ever I feel puzzled by life’s twists and turns I listen to “All Night Thing” and feel a reassurance by Cornell’s spiritual admittance of I do not know what’s going on. Speaking of which — I miss Chris Cornell terribly.

“The Bones of You” by: Elbow

Line —”And IIIIII dealt with this (years ago)” already in the intro, but I just got re-mesmerized (?)… like the first cigarette of the day.

 


Today’s New Music Comes From Saint Louis, Missouri – JillaBeatz



“JillaBeatz aka DJ Jilla-J (A.J.) developed a passion for music at an early age. He started out with a radio/dual cassette player and was sampling & looping in the ’90’s. That evolved into writing rhymes and from ’95 thru ’98 he has numerous recordings on tapes & cds. Got heavily into production, recording, mixing and editing…… all I ask of you is to take a moment of your time and just listen to his latest project”

JillaBeatz

Contact Jilla Beatz



 

ABBA announce first new songs for 35 years


Swedish four-piece take to Instagram to announce two releases that will form part of an ‘avatar tour project’

Abba have announced that they have written and recorded their first new songs since they split in 1983.

The Swedish four-piece, who had nine No 1 hits in the UK between 1974 and 1980, and who have sold hundreds of millions of records worldwide, announced on Instagram that they had recorded two new songs for a project in which avatars of the band will perform.

The band said in a statement: “The decision to go ahead with the exciting Abba avatar tour project had an unexpected consequence. We all felt that, after some 35 years, it could be fun to join forces again and go into the recording studio. So we did. And it was like time had stood still and we had only been away on a short holiday. An extremely joyful experience!”

One of the two new songs that resulted, called I Still Have Faith in You, will feature in a TV special to air in December.

The statement concluded: “We may have come of age, but the song is new. And it feels good.”

Abba’s Björn Ulvaeus revealed details of the band’s forthcoming project in Brussels earlier this week. The centerpiece is the two-hour TV show co-produced by NBC and the BBC, which will see the band perform as computer-generated avatars. Ulvaeus said the band had been digitally scanned and “de-aged” to look like they did in 1979, when they performed their third and final tour.

The avatars are then set to tour the world from next year.

Abba formed in Stockholm in 1972. They comprised two couples: Ulvaeus and Agnetha Fältskog; and Benny Andersson and Anni-Frid Lyngstad, all of whom had enjoyed musical careers in Sweden. The group burst on to the international stage after winning the Eurovision song contest in Brighton in 1974 with their song Waterloo.

From the mid-70s until they split, Abba built up a formidable arsenal of global hits including Knowing Me, Knowing You, Take a Chance on Me, Dancing Queen and The Name of the Game – all of which reached No 1 in the UK.

Fältskog and Lyngstad were the lead singers; Andersson and Ulvaeus composed the songs. Never less than impeccably produced and performed, Abba’s records were critically disdained at the time, but their popularity has endured. Their 1992 compilation Abba Gold has sold 30m copies – more than 5m of those in the Britain – and spent 833 weeks in the UK album charts.

Their jukebox musical Mamma Mia! debuted in the West End in 1999 and is still running both in London and worldwide; its website claims that it has been seen by 60 million people in 440 cities.

The stage show was adapted into a film in 2008, which grossed $615m (£447m) worldwide. A sequel, Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again, will be released in June. The actor Lily James – who is set to appear alongside the cast of the first film including Meryl Streep, Amanda Seyfried and Colin Firth – told the BBC last week: “There’s lot of songs in there, lots of new ones. Lots of ones, actually, that weren’t in my repertoire of Abba and I think they’re going to be huge hits again, and reawaken the love of Abba.”

Abba’s split in 1983 followed the divorces of both couples. Ulvaeus and Andersson went on to write two musicals, including Chess – a revival by the English National Opera opens on Friday in London – before largely devoting themselves to Abba’s legacy. Fältskog and Lyngstad have kept much lower profiles, though Fältskog – long claimed to be a recluse – returned to pop music with an album, A, which was released in 2013.

The group have long held out against lucrative offers to reform – they were reported to have been offered $1bn to play a concert in 2000. In 2014, Ulvaeus told Billboard: “you will never see us on stage again … we don’t need the money, for one thing.”

Peter Robinson, editor of Popjustice, described the announcement as “the biggest pop news of the 21st century. Most fans grudgingly admired Abba’s refusal to record new music, but I think we all sometimes daydreamed about the band possibly, maybe, one day having a rethink at the right time, on the right terms and for the right reasons, which seems to be what’s happened here.” He added: “It’s a pop miracle.”