Gogo Simo, a unique East African sound




Gogo Simo is a seven piece band that plays almost every genre of music. They have recorded two albums titled Gogo Simo and Heshimu respectively. They completed their third album ‘UPAWA; which was launched on 2nd September, 2011. Gogo Simo is without a doubt the best band in Kenya.

They perform 5 days a week every week and are largely popular for entertaining at one of the leading TV shows ‘Churchill Live’. They entertain age groups from 25 to 85. The band consists of bass guitar, keyboards, drums, saxophones, percussion and female lead voice. Almost all the band members are vocalists in their own right. Once you’ve heard Gogo Simo, you keep coming back for more.

Band Members

1. Artist/1stKeyboard/Composer/CEO/Producer/Managing/Music Director: James Gogo

2.Keyboards/Vocals: Mike O W Jozee

3.Drums/Vocals: Mechack Niyo

4.Bass: Moses Karanja

5.Band leader/Saxophone/Vocals: Noah Saha

6.Assistant Band leader/Lead Guitar: David N Omamu

7.BGVs/Lead Vocals:Ruth Muhonja

 
Hometown
Mombasa, Kenya
General Manager
James Gogo
Press contact
+254 728 025 272
Booking agent
+254 728 025 272

Gogo Simo on Facebook

Gogo Simo
Click here to visit Gogo Simo on the web



What A Wonderful World-A Powerful Message From The Great Herb Alpert



“Though there is too much poverty, too many wars, too much hatred and divisiveness in the world, we believe that with love, understanding, kindness, compassion, warmth, respect and humaneness, this beautiful world of ours could be a much better place for every woman, man, child and all of the animals, creatures and nature that live on our planet.”

All proceeds are dedicated to the Louis Armstrong Foundation

The Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, Inc. was founded and funded by Louis Armstrong in 1969 to give back to the world “some of the goodness he received.”

The Foundation is dedicated to perpetuating the legacies of Louis and Lucille Armstrong throughout the world with the following initiatives:

  1. Foster programs, workshops and lectures in schools on the history of music education, as well as supporting access to instruments and scholarships.
  2. Assist and contribute to schools and libraries for events and programs designed to educate students about jazz.
  3. Sponsor programs at all school levels to aid students in developing musical skills.
  4. Support music therapy.

His will left the estate and Foundation to his beloved wife Lucille

For more information about the Louis Armstrong Education Foundation please contact:

Jackie Harris
P.O. Box 3115
New York, NY 10163-3115
Email: permissions@louisarmstrongfoundation.org


Vote for Saxophone Player Temitayo Kayode in Nigeria’s Top 10 Wonder Kids


Searching for Nigeria’s Top 10 Wonder kids

FFM member and prodigious musical talent, saxophone player Temitayo Kayode is taking part in the Nigerian Top 10 Wonder Kids Competition. As you can see and hear on the video, Temitayo is a born musician and entertainer. You can vote for him below

The Top 10 Magazine is in search of 10 child prodigies and super talented Kids who deserve to be on the top 10 list of Nigeria’s outstanding kids that will grace the cover of the next edition of the magazine as “Nigeria’s Top 10 Wonder kids”

Visit Top 10 Magazine and vote for Sax player Temitayo Kayode here




The unmistakable sound of David Powell



By Roger Moisan

Many people possess a talent,  great singing voice or a natural ability in music but are never heard. Occasionally, a few of these unsung heroes will surface after many years of quietly honing their skills and become an ‘overnight success’.

One such musician is Blues guitarist and singer David Powell. David’s voice sits somewhere between Joe Cocker and John Lee Hooker with his authentic and powerful guitar playing completing the package.

David is building a catalogue of his own songs including the moving ‘Jesus is Crying’, ‘Desecrated‘ and ‘At The Bottom‘ with this music fan’s favourite being ‘Crawling into Yesterday‘. This song caught my ear as it demonstrates David’s classical guitar technique fused with the blues feel and powerful vocals.

This amount of talent in one place cannot go unnoticed for long and as David Powell is experienced by more and more lovers of the genre, I am sure we will soon be able to enjoy David’s first commercial release. I for one would be more than happy to release a Powell debut album at FFM Records, but I imagine we will be beaten to the post by the big boys in the industry.

David Powell
David Powell and son



 

Knowing the Building Blocks of Jazz Chord Progressions



A jazz chord progression is made up of smaller blocks of progressions. This video will go over the three most important types of blocks or progressions that you need to know in order to understand the chord progression of a jazz standard. These will help you memorize and play jazz songs and make it possible for you to get better at sight-reading jazz lead-sheets!!

Thanks so much for checking out my weekly lesson at Musicians Unite!! I hope you found this chord progression discussion helpful!!

Please check back next week for another lesson, and in the meantime please catch up with me on my website and social media pages!!

Jens Larsen – MU Educator

Jens’ Website
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Register for Musicians Unite for FREE Today & Receive Your FREE LIFETIME MEMBERSHIP!!



Your New Music Video Album Trailer?


Go to the profile of Bob Baker

Movie trailers have been around for decades — you know, those short teasers that make you yearn to see the full movie.

Video book trailers were all the rage a few years ago.

But I don’t recall seeing many trailers for new music albums — at least not from independent artists.

That’s why I’m so impressed with this new promo trailer from Ryan Marquez.

It includes live performance samples interspersed with interview clips from band members. It’s well done.

Question: Could you do something similar with your next album release?

Bob


Work of the week – Bernd Alois Zimmermann’s Trumpet Concerto “Nobody knows de trouble I see”



On 20th March we celebrated the 100th anniversary of Bernd Alois Zimmermann’s birth. For this reason, many concerts featuring his compositions will be performed worldwide, including one of his most famous works, the Konzert “Nobody knows de trouble I see” für Trompete in C und Orchester. This week, the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra under the direction of Fabien Gabel and with Håkan Hardenberger as soloist, will play it on 23 March, and on the following day it will be performed by Paul Hübner together with the WDR Sinfonieorchester, conducted by Brad Lubman in the Funkhaus in Cologne.

Originally, the NDR commissioned Zimmermann to compose a piano concerto. However, by referencing the existence of countless piano concertos, Zimmermann was able to convince the NDR to promote the trumpet, which was somewhat neglected as a solo instrument, thereby making repeat performances of the work more probable. He had already made drafts of a trumpet concerto years earlier and completed them after he was commissioned. It was premiered on 11 October 1955 in the Studio X in Hamburg with the Sinfonieorchester des Norddeutschen Rundfunks and the trumpeter Adolf Scherbaum under the direction of Ernest Bour. At the time of the world premiere, the work was titled “Darkey’s darkness”. After a few years, however, Zimmerman learned that the word “Darkey” was used to describe a person of color in a contemptuous way, so he changed the title of his work to “Nobody knows de trouble I see” in reference to the spiritual that is used in the composition as cantus firmus.

Bernd Alois Zimmermann – Trumpet concerto: Crossover to reconciliation

The spiritual is at the center of the concerto and its structure is similar to that of a chorale prelude. Apart from this modern kind of a cantus firmus, Zimmermann also uses jazz elements and a twelve-tone-row as the basis for the composition. This special row appears frequently in Zimmermann’s work: It is also used in his Concerto for oboe, his film music for “Methamorphose”, and in his ballet Alagoana. By fusing these three formal principles, Zimmermann hoped to demonstrate a kind of fraternal connection in the music in response to the political realities of his time. As a soldier in the NS-regime and during the composition of the piece, Zimmermann’s awareness of the struggle of people of color in the USA to achieve equality and overcome endemic racial discrimination was heightened. He honors this struggle in the spelling of the title: Instead of “the”, Zimmermann uses a spelling based on the sound of the word as it was passed on through oral tradition, “de”.

“By the way I have recently finished a trumpet concerto with the title “Darkey’s darkness”. The negro spiritual “Nobody knows de trouble I see” underlies the work and the musical characteristics of the spiritual inform and imbue the work with the struggles of the coloured people.” –Bernd Alois Zimmermann, 1954

After this week’s concerts, the concerto can even be heard again. On 6 April, it will be performed by the ORF Radio-Symphonieorchester with Håkan Hardenberger as soloist under the conduction of John Storgårds. In addition, as part of a Zimmermann concert series, the SWR Sinfonieorchester conducted by Ingo Metzmacher will perform the trumpet concerto on 28 April with Håkan Hardenberger again as soloist.

The most recent edition of the Schott Journal is dedicated to Bernd Alois Zimmermann. Therein you can find all events about the anniversary and an insight into his most important works.

 



Coltrane Pitch Diagrams



Go to the profile of Lucas Gonze

In the mid 90s I was browsing in the bookstore at Berklee College of Music in Boston. I was looking for Slonimsky’s Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns, a book of algorithmically-generated scales which had a following among jazz musicians, most notably John Coltrane.

Near it on the shelves I came across a similar but more peculiar book, Repository of Scales and Melodic Patterns, by Yusef Lateef.

As a frontispiece he had included two surprising images.

What were these? A small note at the bottom of the acknowledgements said:

Geometric Drawings: By John Coltrane, 1960. Gifts to Yusef from John.

Over time I became fascinated by the Coltrane drawings and set about decoding them using a protractor, compass and tracing paper.

First I made a clean schematic of Coltrane’s marked-up diagram.

In thinking about it I realized it could be simplified from two rings to one without losing any of the intrinsic relationships.

Of course, from a musician’s perspective this had the surprising result of converting from a whole-tone scale in Coltrane’s original to a chromatic scale in my single-ring version. Then I realized there could be a three-ring version as well, with the intervals on each ring describing diminished triads.

This new three-ring version was visually strange and beautiful, and had a feature that wasn’t evident in either the one-ring or two ring versions: a winding pattern.

Pick a section starting with C and walk to the next C, one semitone at a time. The first four notes of the series would be C, C#, D, Eb. In the one and two ring versions D and Eb are adjacent, but in the three-ring version Eb is on the far ring.

That got me to thinking of the series as a winding banner.

And from there a 3D pattern, not a flat one.

I made a clean final version of this sketch.

From there it was natural to go on to versions with four, five and six rings.

When I had finished my six-ring version, I was sorry that I couldn’t go any further, because each set of rings shows a symmetric interval, and there are no symmetric intervals larger than this.

My drawings were complete, so I made a little title page for the collection.


Not long after I went to a Yusef Lateef concert. It was at Lincoln Center in New York City. He was a stellar player and the show was unforgettable.

After the performance I made my way to the crowd of people chatting by the stage door with the musicians, introduced myself, and asked him to sign my copy of his book.

We talked about the Coltrane diagrams. I showed him a version of my work. He told me that Coltrane had been drawing the original diagrams between sets on a gig they did together, and had given them to him. Lateef said this wasn’t the first time. “He was always doing that,” Lateef said.

That was probably during a period when Coltrane was studying Slonimsky and thinking about generative patterns for melodies. The year was 1960. He was growing from the modernist formalisms of bebop harmony — all bright lines and strict causality — to the ecstatic spirituality of free jazz. The connection between his post-bop and free jazz was numerology, a belief that divine or mystical phenomena can arise from quantitative thinking.

1960 was arguably his peak year. He founded his landmark band with McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones and recorded his signature hit, “My Favorite Things.” Whatever the diagrams meant to him, they were connected with his best art.


Lateef was warm and generous with his time. I promised to send my own schematics, and later that year I did, along with a cover letter.



Join the fastest growing and most dynamic International Musicians Community – FFM on Facebook

Join Freedom For Musicians at our Facebook Home

 

Freedom for musicians is an international cooperative for musicians to share and cross promote each other’s work. In our Facebook group you can promote your gigs, products and
services to an international audience. You can also feature on our website www.ffmrecords.com

What Freedom for Musicians can do for you:

By joining the Facebook group you are automatically a member of FFM.

You can have your music blog or articles published on the website.

You can have your music videos and youtube channel published and promoted at FFM.

You can list your products and services on our musicians directory and in the musicians market.

You can publish your events and concerts on our Upcoming Events feature.

You can be a featured artist.

You can become an FFM Ambassador for your country.

Music students can featured in our Spotlight.

You can release your digital music via our own independent record label FFM Records.

Come and join FFM’s Facebook community and be part of the fastest growing and most dynamic international musicians network.

 

Trumpet Geek Corner – JO-RAL Copper Bottom Trumpet Bucket Mute







Jo-Ral Mutes provide exciting and musical tonal qualities to instrumental playing along with near perfect intonation. Made in a variety of different finishes and materials, the scope for different sounds is limitless. Used extensively throughout the music industry, Jo-Ral Mutes are a fantastic purchase for all musicians.

mutes
Click for more info

Bucket Mute

The Bucket Mute provides an soft and muffled tone, which is caused by cancelling out the really high frequencies. The Jo-Ral buckets are designed almost like over sized straight mutes but with a different head with slits down the sides for air release.

Copper Bottom Mute

The aluminium body combined with a copper bottom to the mute provides a denser and more sonorous sound to the muted trumpet. With a slightly different overtone pattern to an all-aluminium mute, it is preferred by many symphonic players.