Vote for Saxophone Player Temitayo Kayode in Nigeria’s Top 10 Wonder Kids


Searching for Nigeria’s Top 10 Wonder kids

FFM member and prodigious musical talent, saxophone player Temitayo Kayode is taking part in the Nigerian Top 10 Wonder Kids Competition. As you can see and hear on the video, Temitayo is a born musician and entertainer. You can vote for him below

The Top 10 Magazine is in search of 10 child prodigies and super talented Kids who deserve to be on the top 10 list of Nigeria’s outstanding kids that will grace the cover of the next edition of the magazine as “Nigeria’s Top 10 Wonder kids”

Visit Top 10 Magazine and vote for Sax player Temitayo Kayode here




Coltrane Pitch Diagrams



Go to the profile of Lucas Gonze

In the mid 90s I was browsing in the bookstore at Berklee College of Music in Boston. I was looking for Slonimsky’s Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns, a book of algorithmically-generated scales which had a following among jazz musicians, most notably John Coltrane.

Near it on the shelves I came across a similar but more peculiar book, Repository of Scales and Melodic Patterns, by Yusef Lateef.

As a frontispiece he had included two surprising images.

What were these? A small note at the bottom of the acknowledgements said:

Geometric Drawings: By John Coltrane, 1960. Gifts to Yusef from John.

Over time I became fascinated by the Coltrane drawings and set about decoding them using a protractor, compass and tracing paper.

First I made a clean schematic of Coltrane’s marked-up diagram.

In thinking about it I realized it could be simplified from two rings to one without losing any of the intrinsic relationships.

Of course, from a musician’s perspective this had the surprising result of converting from a whole-tone scale in Coltrane’s original to a chromatic scale in my single-ring version. Then I realized there could be a three-ring version as well, with the intervals on each ring describing diminished triads.

This new three-ring version was visually strange and beautiful, and had a feature that wasn’t evident in either the one-ring or two ring versions: a winding pattern.

Pick a section starting with C and walk to the next C, one semitone at a time. The first four notes of the series would be C, C#, D, Eb. In the one and two ring versions D and Eb are adjacent, but in the three-ring version Eb is on the far ring.

That got me to thinking of the series as a winding banner.

And from there a 3D pattern, not a flat one.

I made a clean final version of this sketch.

From there it was natural to go on to versions with four, five and six rings.

When I had finished my six-ring version, I was sorry that I couldn’t go any further, because each set of rings shows a symmetric interval, and there are no symmetric intervals larger than this.

My drawings were complete, so I made a little title page for the collection.


Not long after I went to a Yusef Lateef concert. It was at Lincoln Center in New York City. He was a stellar player and the show was unforgettable.

After the performance I made my way to the crowd of people chatting by the stage door with the musicians, introduced myself, and asked him to sign my copy of his book.

We talked about the Coltrane diagrams. I showed him a version of my work. He told me that Coltrane had been drawing the original diagrams between sets on a gig they did together, and had given them to him. Lateef said this wasn’t the first time. “He was always doing that,” Lateef said.

That was probably during a period when Coltrane was studying Slonimsky and thinking about generative patterns for melodies. The year was 1960. He was growing from the modernist formalisms of bebop harmony — all bright lines and strict causality — to the ecstatic spirituality of free jazz. The connection between his post-bop and free jazz was numerology, a belief that divine or mystical phenomena can arise from quantitative thinking.

1960 was arguably his peak year. He founded his landmark band with McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones and recorded his signature hit, “My Favorite Things.” Whatever the diagrams meant to him, they were connected with his best art.


Lateef was warm and generous with his time. I promised to send my own schematics, and later that year I did, along with a cover letter.



Today’s FFM Stage belongs to Sax Player Robson Tadeu


Introducing Brazilian Saxophonist Robson Tadeu. Check out his Youtube channel and share the love by subscribing.

Não coloque limites em seus sonhos, coloque FÉ!

 



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Much love and happy music making,
Roger Moisan




Altissimo Fingerings for the Saxophone





Most of the time when I am out where other saxophonists can hear me play the question I get most often is how I have such flexibility in the altissimo register. Well aside from the hours I spent developing the range and sound of my altissimo register I think that the fingerings, for me, are the key.

After years of experimenting, these particular fingerings I have found flow easily from note to note and allow the ability to play intervalically. So, I encourage those who wish to learn these notes, start slowly. Beginning in the normal range of the saxophone (high D, E, or F) work up chromatically one note at a time. Get smooth going from the normal range to the altissimo.

Focus on transitioning and maintaining the tone. Pull out your scale exercises and work on playing your scales from within the normal to the altissimo range and when you are comfortable move on to playing entire scales in the altissimo. Once this is working for you, work on the interval studies.

I encourage you to follow this method to become able to play in the altissimo as freely as in the normal range. Above all, do this slowly. It took me nearly 4 years of study to become “fluid” at using the altissimo and I still have some sequences that are difficult to play spontaneously.

If you can get a copy of “The Art of the Saxophone” there are exercises to learn and practice the overtones of the saxophone. Learn and practice this to get a jump ahead on the playing of the altissimo. By the way, I started trying the fingerings in this book but altered them to the ones below which work for me. (All are with octave key.)

 

 

I hope that these charts will help you not only expand your range but expand your mind with new ideas and your heart with new hope for creativity. If you have any altissimo fingerings that work better for you, please share them here at Musicians Unite.

Never let cash money determine your availability. If you have the opportunity to play take it and make it the best gig of your life!!

Have a great week, check out some of the other articles on Musicians Unite and think of ways that you can use the information provided. Spread the word, share the link to us and add your comments below!! Thanks for reading!!

If you have any questions or comments please leave them in the comments section below or message me on my Facebook page!!

-Frank Valdez – MU Columnist