5 Songs I Listen To For Just One Line – Straight to my head like the first cigarette of the day


Go to the profile of Jeff Gorra

One line is all it takes. Sometimes, it’s just one word.

It happened to me this morning. “Jeff, how long have you been standing there in that same spot? You looked so focused, but content.” This was the first greeting I received at my office today. It’s because I was thumbing through the song list on my phone like I was throwing a discus, trying to find the one song I needed to hear in that moment — all for one line. It was “The Bones of You” by Elbow.

“When out of a doorway
The tentacles stretch of a song that I know
And the world moves in slow-mo
Straight to my head like the first cigarette of the day….

… and I dealt with this years ago
I took a hammer to every memento
But image on image like beads on a rosary
Pulled through my head as the music takes hold”

Had to have it.

At this point, I had not had my morning coffee yet so the ‘The Bones of You” was to go straight to my head like the first cigarette of the day. Consider it a healthy hit.

Six years ago, I had no idea who Elbow was. I had Palladia on in my living room and they airing a Glastonbury Festival special. Elbow happened to be performing. I was in the process of fixing a front door when all of sudden I whipped my head around at the sound of Guy Garvey’s voice. That’s just it — I’m talking about a particular line of song here, but much of the gravitation has to do with the singer’s delivery. Garvey took a deep breath, dug deep, and fired out … “And IIIIIII dealt with this years ago….”

Dealt with this years ago? What does that mean? A recurring problem? A beautiful persistence? I still don’t know, but I am continually fascinated by that line and how it connects back to the verse that precedes it (quoted above). It strings together the song, the passion and a “high” all through word placement and it’s position within the composition. Garvey recognizes that then shoots it into the sky like a flaming arrow.

There are a few songs like this for me. It’s like having a shiny pair of sneakers right in front of you, but you have to wear your worn-out Nike’s in the closet because they are reliable and give you a stability to take on the day like no other pair. It’s trust, but it’s also a calibration. That one line or word matches what you feel in that moment. It gives you an injection of exactly what you need to get right. It’s an understanding.

With that in mind, here are my five. What are yours?

“Hard to Imagine” by: Pearl Jam

Line — “…I hope this works somehow.” Disclaimer — this is one of my favorite songs in the universe. But at the last chorus, Eddie Vedder changes one line. Gone is the floating lone “somehow.” Three words are added to the front in …”I hope this works.” It’s so strong and vulnerable at the same time, and I feel it encapsulates the movement of the entire song.

“Ramble” by: Silverchair

Line — “And the ocean of time.” The ocean of time? I’ve never heard anyone make that analogy before, but Daniel Johns does it perfectly. This is such a melodic (and rare) song to begin with. The verses are like smooth waves and this is the 4th swell. The ironic thing is the line before this reads “in the dark of my mind.” Whoa. Intense. But “and the ocean of time” balances it out. What a mirage. An ocean of time — it could be anything.

 

“Overjoyed” by: Stevie Wonder

Word — “Over”. This is a unique one because it does not center around a particular moment in the song. I’m not eagerly anticipating the 1:47 mark. The word “over” is used 13 times throughout the 3 minute, 43 second song and I’m constantly focused on it. Over — time, over — dreams, over — hearts, over — love, over — me, over — you, over-joyed. The genius that is Stevie Wonder uses the word “over” to guide the entire journey. He stresses the two-syllables each time and leverages it to send you on your way through the next topic. It’s like one of those toys that you open up where there’s a smaller version of the exact toy inside. Then you do it again and again until you find there are about 12 renditions of the same figure all contained in one. “Overjoyed” has a bunch of tiny “overs” all layered into the main figure, which is overjoyed. Off topic — but this also song reminds me of my mom who always encourages me to continuing writing pieces like this.

“All Night Thing” by: Temple of the Dog/Chris Cornell

Line —“I do not know… what’s going on?” It’s the pause between “know” and “what’s.” These lyrics soar above an organ and for me, it’s multi-dimensional. Cornell always had an uncanny ability to have profound lyrics that were deep and could serve as your friend. If I ever I feel puzzled by life’s twists and turns I listen to “All Night Thing” and feel a reassurance by Cornell’s spiritual admittance of I do not know what’s going on. Speaking of which — I miss Chris Cornell terribly.

“The Bones of You” by: Elbow

Line —”And IIIIII dealt with this (years ago)” already in the intro, but I just got re-mesmerized (?)… like the first cigarette of the day.

 


The Arban Cornet Method – A Free, Legal Download


The Arban Method (La grande méthode complète de cornet à piston et de saxhorn par Arban) is a complete pedagogical method for students of trumpetcornet, and other brass instruments. The original edition was published by Jean-Baptiste Arban sometime before 1859 and is currently in print.[1] It contains hundreds of exercises, ranging in difficulty. The method begins with basic exercises and progresses to very advanced compositions, including the famous arrangement of Carnival of Venice.

Below you will find three of the main sections of the Arban which you can download for free totally legally.

Pages 1-56

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Pages 123-190

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Pages 283-347

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If this has been helpful to you, please help us by clicking on our sponsor’s ads. It won’t cost you anything but we will get a few pence per click.

Much love and happy brass playing,

Roger Moisan.












‘Good Booty’ Explores A Century Of Music, Sex And American Culture

In her new book, Good Booty, music critic Ann Powers embarks on a wide-ranging history of pop music in America. The title, she says, was inspired by Little Richard’s 1955 hit “Tutti Frutti.”

“In the song we all know it’s ‘Tutti frutti, oh Rudy,’ ” Powers explains. “But in the original version, which Little Richard first sang … it was ‘good booty.’ And the lyrics were very, very dirty, frankly. They were all about greasy, sexy, exciting encounters; something you couldn’t play on the radio.”

Powers’ book, which is subtitled “Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music” looks at more than a century of music as a lens through which to explore American views on sex, race and spirituality.

“Body and soul are inseparable …” she says. “And I think music is that connective tissue that reminds us that all of our experiences, even transcendent experiences, are generated in our bodies.”


MoondogMayne YouTube

Interview Highlights

On how Little Richard inspired the book title

Little Richard is arguably, or perhaps inarguably, the founding father of rock ‘n’ roll. I mean, I talk about Elvis, I talk about Buddy Holly, other rock ‘n’ roll icons from that same time period. But as far as the style and the spirit of rock ‘n’ roll, I can’t think of a better embodiment than Little Richard. I mean, this is a guy who … gave us a new language to talk about — what we feel in our bodies that we don’t always have other ways to discuss.

On the affect rhythm has on our bodies

One thing I discovered while researching this book was there’s a term called “entrainment” and it’s a term that has to do with the nervous system and how certain things outside of our bodies can actually affect our bodies and kind of change our nervous system cycles; the way our heart beats … the way … our nerves feel and music has that power. …

Good Booty
Good Booty

Love and Sex, Black & White, Body and Soul in American Music

by Ann Powers

Hardcover, 448 pages

purchase

All music is rooted in rhythm, but particularly American music, which is defined by an African foundation and an African diaspora foundation. And so the rhythms that came through the Middle Passage, through the Caribbean to the states, which we still hear today, in you know, the music of Beyoncé, the music of the Top 40 in general. Those rhythms move our body in a particular way and help us kind of feel the things that we don’t name.

On music and sex

[It’s] a cliché to say that popular music and particularly rock ‘n’ roll is about sex or is, you know, motivated by sex, sexual feelings. But I wanted to go deeper. … I wanted to go beyond just that kind of clichéd statement. Oh yeah, of course, this is “dirty music” or whatever and really think about how, in every era from the 19th century to the present, the particular anxieties of the time and the possibilities of that time were reflected in and shaped by music.

So, for example, in the ’50s, the teenager was this new phenomenon and you know, this newly named phase of life teenage life. And people were very worried about young kids experimenting sexually, so the music reflected that. The music also guided kids through their early attempts to be erotic beings. Now kids are living on the Internet, we’re all living on the Internet. So I talk about how artists like Britney Spears with their very processed voices kind of embody virtual reality and a cyborgian way of being that reflects what’s happening erotically in cyberspace.

On music and race

Ann Powers is NPR Music’s critic and correspondent. You can read more of her work on The Record blog.

Lucent Vignette Photography/HarperCollins

In the origins of the recording industry, black and white recordings were segregated by race and, of course, this is a key aspect of the story. I say early in the book that there is absolutely no way to talk about American music — or frankly America in any way — without discussing the oppression of African-Americans, the enslavement of Africans. …

All of those things are just foundational in our culture and especially in music because, really music was the lifeline, the conveyor, for African Diaspora culture to live on as enslaved Africans became African-Americans … through the Jim Crow era into the 20th century, into the era of civil rights and into our present day.

Music is the carrier of legacies and it’s also a place in which cultures mix … sometimes through appropriation and theft, sometimes through genuine collaboration. And I wanted to look at all of that stuff. It can be hard to talk about, but I think it’s super important.

On using music as a guide through history

I think every era poses different challenges and limits and also offers different possibilities. … Right now we’re in such an incredibly challenging time in terms of relating to each other across lines of identity and recognizing oppression and some of the most intense realities of our own history. I think music can guide us through that history in a very deep way, including the history of race relations and particularly relations between African-Americans and white people in this country.

Certainly issues of appropriation arise. … But what I think is that music reflects the best of us coming together but also has offered a way for communities to preserve their own traditions and legacies and to speak to each other through those legacies.

So music … I’m not saying it’s utopian. I really don’t believe that and I’m not saying that it’s all about liberation. I think it’s important to recognize that in music we share our ugliest emotions as well as our most beautiful emotions.

Elizabeth Baker and Janaya Williams produced and edited the audio of this interview. Maquita Peters adapted it for the Web.

ROGER MOISAN SAYS, “MAKE IT LOOK EASY”

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roger moisanRoger Moisan is famous for having turned down a Pink Floyd gig. He’s the founder of Freedom for Musicians, an online platform for musicians and artists to maximize the potential to monetize their musical skills.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

THREE KEY TAKEAWAYS

  1. The perils of “youthful arrogance.”
  2. There’s nothing more important to your performing career than your integrity.
  3. For every failure, there’s a moment of redemption.

ROGER’S WORST MOMENT AS A PERFORMER

“It was wrapped up in youthful arrogance. I had an audition in front of the brass musicians of the London Symphony for a scholarship sponsored by the LSO. I knew I had practiced it enough, although my teacher said differently. I had never rehearsed it with a pianist. AS it went from bad to worse, I was clamming up, my palms were becoming sweaty and I was looking right into the eyes of Maurice Murphy, one of my heroes on the trumpet.

“As we got to the slow section, Maurice walked up to me and said, ‘I think we’ll stop here.’ I had serious issues with performance anxiety after that for several months.”

QUOTABLE QUOTES

  • “I’ve had more fun sharing the story as to why I didn’t play with Pink Floyd than the gig would have been.”
  • “Prepare, Prepare, Prepare. The moment you think you’re prepared, start preparing.”

THE HOT SEAT

Q: It’s 5 minutes before you go on stage for an important performance… What are you doing?

A: Checking, checking, checking. My music, my trumpet, my valves, myself. I also visualize the performance beginning to end, and it’s perfect.

Q: What’s the best performance-related advice you’ve ever received?

A:  Concentrate on the sound. If the sound is horrible, no one wants to hear you. Make it look easy.

Q: Can you share one tip for our listeners to help deal with stage fright? (Physical, mental, etc.)

A: Prepare, prepare, prepare. And when you think you’ve prepared, start preparing. The moment you think you’ve got it put together is when you’re most prone to make mistakes.

Q: What’s a non-musical activity that contributes to your success as a musician?

A: Sport. Playing and watching. The discipline required to play sports can teach a lot to musicians.

Q: Imagine you’re on stage. It’s the end of the performance and the audience is on its feet, applauding. They don’t want any more and they don’t want any less. Everything is perfect. What have you just done?

A: I’m at Royal Albert Hall at the BBC Proms. I’m playing the Arutunian trumpet concerto in front of 3,000 people. It’s gone stunningly well. All those people that were in that terrible audition years ago are looking at me, saying, “Well done, Roger.”

You can now study online one-to-one with Roger Moisan