What is Stratos? A Product Review


Stratos Brass Embouchure Training System

The Stratos Brass Embouchure Training System is an adjustable attachment for all brass instruments designed to improve your embouchure. The Stratos Embouchure System helps to reduce mouthpiece pressure by counteracting the natural urge to pull the instrument closer to your face. This will directly improve your range, power, tone, stamina and overall playing. The Stratos System is handcrafted in the UK from high-quality aviation grade polished aluminium and simply attaches to the leadpipe of any brass instrument.

Stratos
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Power Without Pressure

The Stratos Brass Embouchure Training System is a high-quality practice aid which reduces mouthpiece pressure and ensures a good jaw position. Excessive mouthpiece pressure restricts the flow of blood to the lips which results in reduced stamina. This is because the muscles at the sides of the lips are hardly being used and these muscles determine lip tension. The Stratos System encourages a balanced “floating” jaw position by reducing mouthpiece pressure and ensures the correct muscles are used. By using the Stratos System to encourage the correct position, musicians will develop an even tone throughout the entire range of their instrument.

Stratos
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Fully Adjustable

The Stratos Embouchure System is incredibly versatile and can fit onto the leadpipe of any brass instrument. The system is easily adjustable to ensure the sprung cushioned cup sits comfortably against the musician. The Stratos System is handcrafted in the UK from professional aviation grade aluminium which is then polished to match the aesthetic of your brass instrument.

Reviews

“I want one and I want it now” Jens Lindemann CM – International Trumpet Soloist

“STRATOS is particularly useful in my warm-up, to focus my mind on the basics of a good embouchure set-up. Really useful … a great bit of kit” David Pyatt – Principal Horn, London Philharmonic Orchestra

“As an educator and a trombone player, I was so amazed with the STRATOS as a beneficial aid for the chops (lips) that every brass player should have. I believe this to be an invaluable tool for busy educators like myself. I would recommend it to all brass students.” Lord Chris Jeans – International Trombone Soloist

Stratos
Get your Stratos here




Intuitive Guitar – Major Scale Modes. A fantastic new App for guitarists



Why is it that many video courses, guitar lessons, guitarists, apps and tutorials explain the concept of modes for guitar over and over again? Because they are very useful of course, but somewhat fail as one usually ends up with fretboard diagrams filled with dots and patterns and it all seems like a big intellectual challenge to memorize all positions at once, all keys, all strings… so many different combinations, and how to make them sound musical and flow through them without sounding like a robot is going up and down a scale?

We believe the solution is learning through intuition and repetition with carefully designed objective oriented practice routines. Time is important, so optimizing your practice time is essential to make progress and stop wasting time.

This approach to learning the modes of the major scale for guitar is simple and effective, just play along a practice routine for 10 minutes a day and the whole fretboard will start to open up for you. The routines cover all seven modes of the major scale parallel to each other in the key of C. We are approaching guitar fretboard visualization in 3-string shapes that cover only one octave, which makes them easy to manipulate, instead of large 6-string shapes, CAGED, 3 notes per string or other conventional shapes. This process will allow you to always keep in mind the intervallic relationship of the note you are playing against the root. Basic modal theory is included and we focus on the 7 modes of the major scale: Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian.

Features:
– New effortless approach to learning music theory and skills
– Fly through the 7 Modes of the Major Scale
– 21 well designed guitar practice routines for daily practice
– 14 Backing tracks/modal loops with advanced audio pitch-shifting, tempo variations, and an equalizer
– Fully featured tab section with zoom, fast scrolling, loops, tempo and tonality change
– Modal Music Theory
– Built-in Metronome

We think that in today’s digital world privacy is of the utmost importance. You can read the complete policy here: http://www.amparosoft.com/privacy

NOTE: If you run into any issues, have questions or suggestions, please email us to amparosoft@gmail.com

All content is property of AmparoSoft
All music is composed and played by Otto Reina

Download The App Here




Kaleka Keys – Nitenge featuring KatOyo A Ayoo




Victor Kaleka, better known as “Kaleka Keys”, is a keyboard player/pianist, composer, song writer and performing artist born in Kenya and based in Nairobi. His music cuts across the genres of Afro- Jazz, Gospel music and R&B.

His music career started in 2012 after high school when he began working with different bands. He grew fast within the music industry through hard work, motivation and discipline. He has performed in events and festivals in Kenya such as Koroga Festival, Kwetu festival, Cake Festival and many others.

He has worked with some of Kenya’s popular artists like Juliani and LJ Maasai. Currently, he is playing for an artist called Kidum Kibido who is well recognized internationally.
Among the artists who inspire him are; Brian Culbertson, Chick Korea, Cory Henry, Richard Bona, Shawn Martin and George Duke. His vision is to bring African Fused Jazz with a different feel.

Everything he knows is self-taught. He trained himself to play the keyboard by ear, listening to other musicians and practicing with YouTube tutorials.

Kaleka Keys is currently working on his first Album called “Flower Garden”. He has released one Single out ‘Blind Love – Official Music Video’

Kaleka Keys
Click for more about Kaleka Keys



 

Gogo Simo, a unique East African sound




Gogo Simo is a seven piece band that plays almost every genre of music. They have recorded two albums titled Gogo Simo and Heshimu respectively. They completed their third album ‘UPAWA; which was launched on 2nd September, 2011. Gogo Simo is without a doubt the best band in Kenya.

They perform 5 days a week every week and are largely popular for entertaining at one of the leading TV shows ‘Churchill Live’. They entertain age groups from 25 to 85. The band consists of bass guitar, keyboards, drums, saxophones, percussion and female lead voice. Almost all the band members are vocalists in their own right. Once you’ve heard Gogo Simo, you keep coming back for more.

Band Members

1. Artist/1stKeyboard/Composer/CEO/Producer/Managing/Music Director: James Gogo

2.Keyboards/Vocals: Mike O W Jozee

3.Drums/Vocals: Mechack Niyo

4.Bass: Moses Karanja

5.Band leader/Saxophone/Vocals: Noah Saha

6.Assistant Band leader/Lead Guitar: David N Omamu

7.BGVs/Lead Vocals:Ruth Muhonja

 
Hometown
Mombasa, Kenya
General Manager
James Gogo
Press contact
+254 728 025 272
Booking agent
+254 728 025 272

Gogo Simo on Facebook

Gogo Simo
Click here to visit Gogo Simo on the web



Scott Hutchinson aged 36, may you now find peace

Scott Hutchison, the lead singer and songwriter of the Scottish folk-rock band Frightened Rabbit, was found dead on Thursday near South Queensferry, Scotland, the Edinburgh police confirmed, after a days-long search for the musician, who was said to be in a “fragile state.”

The police could not immediately identify a cause of death, but said it was not being treated as suspicious.

Mr. Hutchison, 36, had not been seen since the early morning hours on Wednesday, when he left a hotel in South Queensferry after sending two cryptic messages on Twitter. He wrote: “Be so good to everyone you love. It’s not a given. I’m so annoyed that it’s not. I didn’t live by that standard and it kills me. Please, hug your loved ones,” and “I’m away now. Thanks.”

Good luck SuRie in the Eurovision Song Contest


She’s a fan of Jeff Buckley who once harboured dreams of signing for Bella Union. So, can this dance diva succeed where Blue and Bonnie Tyler faltered?

“Welcome to my hooooome,” SuRie deadpans, before bursting into laughter. We are meeting ahead of the Eurovision final in Lisbon, and the UK’s contestant is perched on a velvet-upholstered chair in the opulent Portuguese embassy in London. She throws herself into the role of tour guide with aplomb. “If you see this tapestry,” she says, gesturing to a floor-to-ceiling artwork of a fleet of ships, “it depicts a voyage from Lisbon to the UK, and now I’m doing the reverse. I think there’s a lovely link.”

Today, SuRie, 29, is wearing roomy black athleisure; her candyfloss-coloured hair is cut into a short crop like Katy Perry’s. In the past her music has skewed slightly alternative, and pre-Eurovision she released a heartfelt piano-led cover of Jeff Buckley’s Lover, You Should’ve Come Over. But her current song, Storm, flips that 180 degrees: it’s a distillation of EDM and 90s dance that feels slightly dated but has the nefarious sticking power of an ad jingle. “Storms don’t last for ever,” SuRie belts out stagily, bringing to mind all those divas who have sung of making it through the rain to welcome a new day.

“It means a lot to me,” she says of her song. “I need a reminder sometimes to keep my chin up and keep perspective. If we come together, concentrating on love and positivity, we can get through it all.”

SuRie’s hope is that her posi-pop earworm will be enough to give the UK its first Eurovision win since Katrina and the Waves’ Love Shine a Light back in 1997. Even the most dedicated fan of the contest would find it hard to deny that the UK has dropped the ball in recent years, with unmemorable entries from Blue, Bonnie Tyler and last year’s balladeer, Lucie Jones. “I don’t know what the problem is,” SuRie says. “But I hope to be a small cog in that wheel of trying to improve the reputation.”


FFM Supports the Royal British Legion and the Poppy Lottery



The Royal British Legion was founded by veterans after the First World War. A century on from the start of that conflict, we’re still helping members of the Royal Navy, British Army, Royal Air Force, Reservists, veterans and their families in almost every aspect of daily life. We also organise the Poppy Appeal, safeguarding the memory of those who have given their lives for our freedom through Remembrance education and events.

By playing the Poppy Lottery you will support the vital work of The Royal British Legion. Which means you’ll be helping brave serving and ex-Service men and women and their families, across the UK. Your £1 could help us:

  • Run our state-of-the art Battle Back Centre (Lilleshall) for injured or sick Service personnel
  • Offer advice to Service leavers exploring a new career outside the Forces
  • Provide long-term care for elderly veterans in our care homes
  • Carry out home repairs or provide mobility aids for veterans
  • Safeguard the memory of those who have given their lives for our freedom, through Remembrance education and events
  • Support Service families and children through our break centres
  • Continue our Bravo 22 Company recovery through arts proagramme




A Fantastic Musical Project In Uganda by Innocent Wodonya

FFM’s  Uganda Ambassador,  Innocent Wodonya is raising money to help young musicians in Uganda. They need to buy instruments to continue the fantastic work already being done by the David Kiwana Wind Orchestra. Please visit their GoFund Site and pledge a few pounds/dollars/yen to help them give music to young people in Uganda.
Innocent Wodonya
Innocent Wodonya 
“We are a starting a wind classics band and we intend to give chance to our players  to play music and we really need your support for us to do it please whatever you give will help give a chance to one African child  to play music .
Thank you all  friends around the world .
Help spread the word!”
 Innocent Wodonya

The international language of music spreads love and friendship around the world and FFM Records will ultimately record and distribute a digital album for our Ugandan friends to create a sustainable source of income for the future.
The music education outreach that music provides is a priceless lifeline for many Ugandans creating  opportunities for personal development much needed in the area.

Please help us help these wonderful musicians be the best they can.
Roger Moisan LTCL PGCE
(CEO Freedom For Musicians)

Please Visit our GoFund Page



Our first Freedom For Musicians Recording Artists from across the globe

It is with great pride that we present to you, FFM Records’ catalogue of our very own recording artists. As FFM grows, so does our record label and our first artists come from four different continents and musical genres.

Introducing

Miss Dee by Dita Nurdian

FFM Artist – Dita Nurdian

Dita Nurdian is an Indonesian writer of electronica and dance music. Her passion for this genre is evident in her prolific output. At FFM Records, we have released 4 of Dita’s latest tracks and you can download them here, Beatport and stream on Spotify.

Measure of Abstract by Slawomir Rataj

FFM Artist – Slawomir Rataj

Slawomir Rataj is a guitarist and composer from Poland. Recently released under the FFM Records label,  Slawomir’s debut album ‘Measure of Abstract’ is an instrumental album that combines electronica with Slawomir’s phenomenal guitar playing.

You can download the album here, at itunes and stream on Spotify.

Transformation by Paul Hinman

FFM Artist – Paul Hinman

Paul Hinman is a UK based singer songwriter whose songs reflect  events that he has experienced in a rich and varied life. You can download Paul’s debut album here and stream on Spotify.

Raag Puriya Dhanashree by Ankur Biplav

FFM Artist – Ankur Biplav

Ankur Biplav is an Indian Classical Music singer specialising in South Indian Carnatic music.

Indian classical music has two foundational elements, raga and tala. The raga forms the fabric of a melodic structure, while the tala measures the time cycle.

The raga gives the artist a palette to build the melody from sounds, while the tala provides them with a creative framework for rhythmic improvisation using time.

FFM Artist – Andy Anies

Andy Anies is a Songwriter with thirty years of songwriting experience who has made it in the Gospel Music arena with 5 Albums. He has written songs for various artists as a ghostwriter. Andy is a versatile Stage Performer who makes it live on Stand-up Comedy, as he plays on the Solo Guitar over his mouth-organ.

FFM Artist – Debdeep Misra

Born in 1993, Debdeep Misra the grandson of legendary vocalist Pandit Bishnu Sebak Misra of Benaras gharana(piyari gharana) loved music enough to start listening, appreciating and learning at a very tender age of four under the guidance of his mother smt. Banani Misra-one of the desciples of Pt. A.kanan and Vidushi Girija Devi and his father who is disciple of pt. Mani lal Nag.



Why do we learn to play the recorder at school?


400 years ago, the recorder was so popular that people were writing concertos for it. Now, we associate it with primary school music lessons. We’re here to explain why…

Long before it was used as a teaching instrument, Renaissance and Baroque composers like Monteverdi, Purcell and Bach loved to compose for this small, whistle-like instrument. Here’s Vivaldi’s lovely Recorder Concerto in C:


Back then, all recorders would have been made from wood and ivory – a far cry from today’s primary school plastic numbers.

So why did we start using them to play ‘Mary Had a Little Lamb’?

Fast forward to the 1900s, when Carl Orff – that’s the German composer who wrote Carmina Burana (the cantata which includes the epic ‘O Fortuna’) – thought it would be a great idea to use the soprano recorder as a teaching tool.

Aside from writing excellent music that would later be poached by The X Factor, Orff became instrumental in shaping music education theory in the 20th century.

His Orff Schulwerk encouraged learning music through rhythm and creative thinking, methods he thought to be much more effective (and enjoyable) than learning by repetition.

The work also called for a wider range of simple, easy-to-play instruments, specifically those with a similar vocal range to a child. Orff figured that if a child could sing the notes they were playing, they’d be more likely to understand it.

To him, the soprano recorder’s lack of strings, reeds, bow – or need to develop a good embouchure in order to make a half-decent sound on it – made it the perfect instrument to inspire children to play music. You could say the same for other teaching instruments, like the glockenspiel or the tambourine.

So do people still play the recorder seriously?

Sure they do! Recorders can be as small and simple as the soprano recorder, and as big and practically impossible to play as the contrabass recorder (there’s also the sub-contrabass recorder, which is even scarier). It looks like this:

Contrabass recorder

Imagine trying to play ‘Mary Had a Little Lamb’ on THAT.

Here’s the Palisander Quartet, making the recorder look advanced and awesome:

Palisander: The Nightmare Concerto
Palisander Recorder Ensemble playing Vivaldi’s ‘The Nightmare Concerto’, arranged by Miriam Nerval.