Today’s FFM Stage belongs to New York City’s Stephanie Jeannot


Please give a warm welcome to NY jazz singer and song writer Stephanie Jeannot. Check out and subscribe to Stephanie’s channel below and listen to her music on Spotify.

Stephanie Jeannot
Stephanie Jeannot live in NY
Stephanie Jeannot
Singer song writer Stephanie Jeannot
If this has been helpful to you, please help us by clicking on our sponsor’s ads. It won’t cost you anything but we will get a few pence per click.
Much love and happy music making,
Roger Moisan







Aria Elan – Hotter

Aria Elan’s peace, one love and social justice lyrics are delivered with her signature smooth vocals. Set to a head bopping beat, the music makes you jump up and dance. Please subscribe to Aria Elan’s YouTube channel. You will receive a FREE download of one of Aria’s song when you subscribe to ariaelan.com

A graduate of College of Charleston and Southwestern University School of Law, she worked as an entertainment attorney, founded Isis Management, representing musicians, producers, and artists, including James Brown, Phred Mosbey, Musical Director for Earth, Wind, and Fire, musical group Bel Biv Devoe; the great South African singer, Miriam “Mama Africa” Makeba, Salaelo Maredi, acclaimed South African director, actor & playwright, and many others.
Ms. Elan later founded Sisi Records, releasing a collection of works, including Motown Legend Sylvia Moy’s hit “Love’s Inside” on the “Universal Love” album. Moy wrote and produced Stevie Wonder’s “My Cherie Amor.”

In 1990 she wrote musical “Amandla Ka Mandela,” which was staged at Henry Street Settlement Theatre in Manhattan, New York, which was followed by her historical fiction book “Missionary.”

Singer/Songwriter: Soul singer Aria Elan dropped debut album “Smile” November 1, 2013. Aria has entertained Veterans and active duty troops at various military bases.

She has spoken and performed for the US Navy, U.S. Air Force, women’s conferences, Veteran’s Organizations, and has received certificates of appreciation from the California Youth Authority, College of Charleston, County of Maui, NAACP, Ventura Self Help Clinic, Watts Legal Aid and numerous others.

As a motivational speaker, Aria Elan presents humorous, poignant and memorable stories about Aria’s ABCs of SUCCESS that resonate with people.  Aria performs her “ode to positive thinking” song “Smile” at all speaking engagements.

Introducing Featured Artist – Deena Ade

If we were to google the name Deena Ade, you would find a few of her released projects such as the ‘SIDE CHIC EP’, ‘I DON’T’, ‘INTERVIEWS’ and many more will appear. Some may describe her as a soulful alternative singer, some may describe her as a product of the new wave of music from Africa. We, the management, describe her as the future of Africa.

Born Medina Agboluaje, the first of four children, music has been a substantial goal of Medina since the age of eight. As a child Medina performed around London for a local charity which, eventually led to performing for the late Papa Madiba in this state visit to London. Over twelve years later, Medina can be found performing weekly in London’s hottest underground spots.

Having found much comfort in the training received by mentors such Beats by Sarz and other industry power players. Deena is now ready to face the music industry with the intensity she believes it is lacking. Using a name to define her sound and style can be quite daunting, but under the fabric of her stage performances lies a blueprint of influences. For example Amy Winehouse, Asa, Beyonce, Wizkid, Fela Kuti. 

Deena Ade is currently releasing a song a month for a year which will be followed up by an LP project, set to be released in November titled “THE FEMINIST”. As her talents and fan base continues to grow, she emphasises on people not to over look as her, as she is the future of the African Music Industry. As she says ” It doesn’t matter what people say, as long as they like my music’. 

The dichotomy of music

Guest writer Mandy Edwards

With another reported suicide of a member of a high profile band, I can’t help but feel sad. Not only for the fans of Linkin Park and Soundgarden, but for the music industry as a whole. I massage backstage at high profile gigs and I am reminded of a gig I worked at a few years ago. One that left me feeling unclean, shocked and perturbed. It’s what started a hiatus from that world, because it was a stark lesson of how dark it could go.

They say never meet your idols. You soon realise the ones that ‘make it’ are still stumbling, confused incomplete humans like the rest of us. Trying to find a way to be whole or find some semblance of home or comfort. For many musicians, I think music can be therapy. A way to exorcise the demons, make sense of them, deconstruct them. But I find some musicians never find healing.

I recently had my first guitar lesson after being hypnotised watching Haim rock out on stage at Glastonbury. It made me feel I wanted to ‘be’ them. I can understand the tacit nature of music. How it can speak to you. How it can be addictive. How it can be a natural high. Maybe that’s why so many musicians turn to drugs. To recreate the high they have on stage. Even just watching the 3 guitarists that make up Haim made me feel like I was on some other planet. I can only imagine the magnitude they felt being up there and seeing adoring fans totally rocking out and vibing on their music. What a let down it must be to head onto a tour bus, or go for a Big Mac at Mcdonalds afterwards and thinking ‘people adored me 20mins ago!’ It’s one rocky bump back down to earth.

It’s taken a while for me to love music again, simply because I massaged at a gig of someone I was a fan of. Don’t get my wrong, they weren’t someone I had idolised as a teenager. It didn’t run that deep and thank god it didn’t. Before I even arrived I had pages and pages and pages of Do’s and Don’t’s –  I wasn’t allowed to talk to them even. Of course this musician will have to remain nameless, but all I can say is, they were one of the high contenders. You couldn’t get much bigger in stardom and fame at the time.

I was positioned in a dressing room opposite Costume. My backstage pass was only for that small stretch of corridor. I could hear whispers from one security guard to another. Serious conversations, stressful conversations and I could see the panic. You could cut the atmosphere with a knife. Everyone ran around covering cameras backstage, at the stars request.

All of a sudden someone from costume came in with a hanger in hand. She threw it across the room and shouted

‘what a bitch!’

This woman was almost in tears. Tears of anger and frustration. Clearly she was talking about ‘the boss’ and clearly you now know it’s a woman we are talking about.

Then, I bizarrely bumped into a local GP.  He had been given instructions to go to the Artists hotel room. The fact they were due on stage within the hour didn’t seem to matter. He had to examine the Artist whilst she was asleep, administer an injection, which, of course I had no business knowing exactly what kind of injection, due to confidential reasons. He too wasn’t allowed to talk to her. He seem white as a ghost, almost shell shocked. He said ‘I am never doing that again.’

I was a good girl and stayed in my little corridor, but when it was time for the Artist to go on stage I watched from my vantage point to see if I could see them walk onstage. I did see her. She was walking with her entourage of dancers. All I could hear was her telling her dancers the concoction of drugs she was on. She looked back at her dancers and told them clear as day. She didn’t even whisper. Then she looked me in the eye defiantly. It was almost a glare as if to say ‘how dare you look at me! Did you not get the brief? – it was weird to say the least.

Nothing about that night was joyful, creative, inspiring. It felt dark to a point I had to jump in the shower as I got home and I shuddered. It felt like I was witnessing another Amy Winehouse. It felt tragic and it shattered the illusion.

I think that’s what musicians are. An illusion. To create an illusion. To elevate you. To inspire you. Sometimes they may give so much, they are left empty themselves. Each gig chipping away at them, their soul, their identity. A human shaped outline on the stage, like that of a crime scene. It could easily lead to existential crisis. Who am I really? I can imagine feeling like you are in some sort of warped reality. Living up to what people ‘think’ you are, to the point you lose who you really are.

Maybe they felt empty to start with and the adulation was a way to fill them up. To make them whole. Maybe drugs are a way to get up in front of thousands of people and be unwaveringly brave. Maybe performing day in day out and living up to expectations is too hard to bear. Maybe it’s true that all artists are a little tortured. The scared and vulnerable child inside wanting be liked. Hell, even my guitar teacher told me within 30mins he was taken in by a paedophile ring at aged 6 and music saved him. Interestingly enough he played with Amy Winehouse and mirroringly he called her a bitch too. Full of ego. Maybe when you have talent, you can get to the position where ego just runs away with itself. Where you turn into a monster. You are the spiritual saviour for many, whilst you destroy yourself.

I don’t know the story of Chester Bennington or Chris Cornell’s suicide. I didn’t know them personally. I don’t know why they wanted to escape, but all I know is, I want to find the light in the darkness. I want to create. But I don’t want it to be what makes me whole. I don’t want to get sucked into this tantalising power. I want to be grounded and not driven by ego. Is that what gets us all in the end? Ego. This illusion that we are better, special whilst everyone is down ‘there’. I don’t want to look down, but elevate myself to a higher consciousness, whilst also elevating others. Maybe that’s the answer. Maybe the answer is different for everyone. Maybe we just need to realise the interconnected nature of it all. That we aren’t alone. Demons and all. Isn’t that what music is about after all. To connect us. Maybe we just need to reach out more.

Mandy is a writer, traveller and massage therapist for the music and film industry. Visit Mandy’s regular blog here.

If you have a story to share, send it to us: rogermoisan@yahoo.co.uk

Aria Elan “Hotter”

Aria Elan’s peace, one love and social justice lyrics are delivered with her signature smooth vocals. Set to a head bopping beat, the music makes you jump up and dance. Please subscribe to Aria Elan’s YouTube channel. You will receive a FREE download of one of Aria’s song when you subscribe to ariaelan.com

Gasoline: The brilliant track from Paul Hinman’s debut album




Gasoline

“I was drinking heavily and was splitting up with my first wife to be with my second wife….”Gasoline” is about the man who abused my second wife.”

Paul Hinman

feebz-300x225

Transformation is a snapshot of my life at times I needed to be heard. “Take Control” and “Best Seat”  were written and recorded about 16 years ago when I went ‘’solo’’ after being in different bands for 18 years. I called myself “Skin ‘n’ Bone” back then because the concept behind it was: that’s what I am made of…and the music was from me, using what I had alone. “Dead Bones”, “Gasoline” and “I Know” were written and recorded with a band I formed called “The Bridge” (all south east London boys….bless ‘em…miss those days….fond memories) about 15 years ago. I was drinking heavily and was splitting up with my first wife to be with my second wife….”Gasoline” is about the man who abused my second wife.  




Coming soon from Paul Hinman, the beautiful song ‘I Know’

Ladies Who Sang More Than Just the Blues




Go to the profile of Feminista Jones

Feminista Jones




Equal Opportunities for Women in the Arts and Music





Women in Music, was born in 1978 as a movement promoting and presenting music composed and created by women worldwide, of all genres and in all times. “Equal Opportunities for Women in the Arts and Music” is at the heart of the mission and advocacy undertaken by the Adkins Chiti: Women in Music Foundation, an Italian cultural organisation, partner within cultural agreements undersigned by the Italian Foreign Ministry, member of UNESCO’s International Music Council and the European Music Council, internationally recognised for its activities to obtain recognition and visibility for women in the cultural sector.   The Foundation collaborates with the EUC for research projects. Its work has the patronage of UNESCO and the Arab Academy (network of cultural organisations within the Arab League).

How many women composers and creators of music are included in textbooks and encyclopaedias?  Far too few.  Those present are there because other women – musicians, scholars and historians – have wanted to celebrate their contributions.  If music is not performed, it is not perceived to exist; women’s music is a tangible and intangible part of world heritage.  Making it known is the mission of Women in Music.

The Foundation has a network in 111 countries made up of “Women in Music Organisations”, individual composers, researchers, musicologists, performers and teachers. This network also includes 77 affiliated organisations in 44 countries (associations, conservatories, academies, universities) working on behalf of Women in Music.  In December 2003, with a Decree from the State Archives and Heritage Ministry, the Library and Archives of the Foundation containing over 35 thousand scores of music by women were officially declared to be “historically relevant for the State” and “essential for the study of women’s history”.

READ MORE…