Listen to Mozart played on Mozart’s VERY OWN piano


Please watch this amazing video of pianist Robert Levin playing Mozart’s piano sonatas on Mozart’s ACTUAL PIANO.

Last year, pianist and musicologist Robert Levin was announced as the first Hogwood Fellow of the Academy of Ancient Music. So, we filmed him playing on Mozart’s very own instrument.

The fortepiano, from around 1782, was used by Mozart for both composition and performance from 1785 until his death in 1791.

The piano was originally made by Anton Walter, one of the most famous Viennese piano makers of Mozart’s time. It is two octaves shorter than a modern piano, and is much lighter and smaller than modern pianos, weighing only 85kg. It’s also much smaller than a modern piano, at just 2.23m long.

It can currently be found in Salzburg, where Robert Levin is using it to record Mozart’s piano sonatas.

“The voyage and discovery of playing on period instruments is to move in a world – physical, emotional and aesthetic – that is inhabited by the geniuses that wrote this music. It brings us very, very close to them,” said Levin.

“So sitting down at Mozart’s piano, sitting down at an organ which Bach played himself, you understand things about the weight of the keys going down and the repetition and the balance in sound.

“And all of these things bring you very, very close to the music and make you say ‘A-ha, that’s why it’s written that way’, which is not the kind of thing you’re going to get if you’re playing on the standard instruments that are being manufactured today.”



Product Review – Zoom H1 with Accessory Pack, Matte Black £69.00 inc VAT

X/Y Recording Made Simple

The Zoom H1 Digital Field Recorder’s built-in X/Y microphone provides two matched unidirectional microphones set at a 90 degree angle relative to one another, optimum for most stereo recording applications. For X/Y or other types of recording, you can connect a pair of external microphones or line level signal to the H1’s Mic/Line Input mini phone jack.

The Ins and Outs

The H1 Mic/Line Input is a stereo ⅛” mini phone jack that can accept two mic- and/or line-level signals. Condenser microphones requiring Plug-In Power (2.5 volts) can be connected to this jack. The H1 Line/Headphones Output is a stereo ⅛” phone jack with a dedicated volume control. Headphones can be connected here for private monitoring. There’s also a built-in speaker on the back panel for fast monophonic monitoring of the recorded signal without the need to make any connections. The H1’s USB port provides a digital output of the stereo mix and allows data to be sent to and from your computer. From there, it can be imported into editing software such as the supplied WaveLab LE. It also allows the H1 to be used as a 2-in/2-out audio interface and USB microphone, as well as a microSD card reader.

Auto Level and Low Cut Filter

Overload and distortion are prevented with the H1’s Auto Level function that sets input gain automatically (input level can be set manually, too). The H1 also provides a built-in low cut filter for the elimination of pops, wind noise, blowing, and other kinds of low frequency rumble.

WAV and MP3 Support

The Zoom H1 records audio in both WAV and MP3 formats. The WAV files recorded by the H1 can be either 16- or 24-bit, with sampling rates of 44.1, 48, or 96 kHz, and are automatically time-stamped, making them Broadcast Wave Format (BWF) compliant – ideal for journalists and other professional media.

Battery Life and Recording

The H1 Digital Field Recorder requires just a single AA battery – offering up to 10 hours of operation, even during continuous recording. You can also power the H1 from any standard wall socket using the optional AD-17 AC adapter. The H1 records directly to microSD and microSDHC cards, up to 32 gigabytes.

High Quality Video Audio

The compact, lightweight H1 is perfect for use on a video or DSLR camera. The remarkable depth and clarity of sound achieved by the stereo X/Y mic design brings additional realism and depth to HD video. By combining the H1 with a DSLR video camera, you can create a professional video system with high-quality sound.

Included Accessory Pack

Additionally, the Zoom H1 comes with a useful bunch of accessories that allows you to get the most out of the Zoom H1 recorder. Included is a windscreen that minimises wind noise in demanding weather conditions, helping to retain the audio quality from the H1. The adjustable desktop tripod stabilises your recorder when on the move, or at home, and minimises handle noise to ensure clean recordings. The soft case ensures protection for your H1 during transport and storage. The accessory pack also includes an AC adapter, USB cable, and mic stand clip adapter, allowing you to charge the recorder, and seamlessly transfer files onto a computer or storage device.

What’s Included In Accessory Pack

  • Windscreen
  • Mic stand clip adapter
  • Adjustable desktop tripod
  • Soft case
  • AC adapter
  • USB cable

Reviews

“The Zoom H1 Handy Recorder is unquestionably a bargain” – PC Advisor

“For such a small unit it really can do some impressive recording and will definitely get the job done. Whether you are recording an interview or live music the H1 would be a great tool.” – Videomaker Magazine

Features

  • Built-in 90° X/Y stereo mic
  • Stereo ⅛” Mic/Line Input mini phone jack with Plug-in power (2.5V)
  • Stereo ⅛” Phones/Line Output jack with dedicated volume control
  • Built-in reference speaker for fast monitoring
  • Backlit LCD display
  • Records directly to microSD and microSDHC cards up to 32 GB
  • Supports up to 24-bit/96 kHz audio in BWF-compliant WAV or a variety of MP3 formats
  • Auto Level for automatic control of input level
  • Low-cut filter for elimination of wind noise and rumble
  • Up to 99 marks per recording
  • USB port for data transfer to computer and use as an audio interface and USB microphone
  • SD card reader function
  • Mounts directly to tripod, or to mic stand or DSLR with optional adapter
  • Runs on only 1 standard AA alkaline or NiMH rechargeable battery
  • Up to 10 hours of operation with a single AA alkaline battery

Specifications

  • Simultaneous recording tracks: 2
  • Simultaneous playback tracks: 2
  • Functions: Lo-cut Filter, Auto REC Level, Marker
  • Recording/playback format:
    • WAV: 44.1 / 48 / 96kHz, 16- / 24-bit
    • MP3: 44.1kHz 48/56/64/80/96/112/128/160/192/224/256/320kbps
  • A/D conversion: 24-bit, 128x oversampling
  • D/A conversion: 24-bit, 128x oversampling
  • Signal processing: 32-bit
  • Recording media: microSD card (16MB – 2GB), microSDHC card (4GB – 32GB)
  • Display: 127 segment custom LCD (with backlight)
  • Built-in stereo mic: Unidirectional condenser
  • Gain: 0 to +39dB
  • Minimum gain with digital attenuation: -28dB
  • Maximum sound pressure level: 120dB SPL
  • Mic/line input: 1/8″ stereo phone jack (Plug-in power supported)
  • Input Impedance: 2kΩ (Input level: 0 to -39dBm)
  • Phones/line output: 1/8″ stereo phone jack
  • Output load impedance: 10kΩ or more
  • Rated output level: -10dBm
  • Phones output level: 20mW + 20mW into 32Ω load
  • Output load impedance: 10kΩ or more
  • Rated output level: -10dBm
  • USB interface:
    • Type: Mini-B type (USB 2.0 High Speed compatible), Mass Storage Class operation
    • Format: 44.1 kHz/16-bit or 48 kHz/16-bit
  • Power requirements: Alkaline or Ni-MH AA battery x 1, or AC adapter (AD-17, USB to AC type)
  • Battery life (alkaline batteries): 10 hours (MP3), 9.5 hours (WAV)
  • Dimensions: 44(W) x 136(D) x 31(H)mm
  • Weight: 60g (without batteries)
Zoom H1
Zoom H1 Handy Recorder £69.00 inc VAT



 

Freedom for Musicians – From concept, to birth, to flourishing brain child

Roger Moisan, Founder and Director, Freedom for Musicians
Roger Moisan, Founder/Director, Freedom for Musicians

At the beginning of 2016, I had an idea that I wanted to do something digitally/online that would help fellow musicians and be something that I could give back to the industry. My legacy if you like.

Now, I had no idea what it would be or how to do it so I set about learning the tech, digital marketing and website building. This was quite daunting for this fifty-something dinosaur but I quickly discovered that this modern sorcery was actually pretty easy. (Big thanks to DBL and SFM )

Hence, Freedom for Musicians was born. To be honest, the early manifestation of FFM was quite embarrassing in hindsight with no real identity and clumsy tech. However, I persevered and we now have a thriving online music magazine, independent record label and growing community of nearly 5000 musicians worldwide. FFM has Ambassadors representing Uganda, Kenya, Ghana, Canada, India, Azerbaijan, Czech Republic, Italy, USA, UK, Jersey CI and Indonesia. My initial concept has come a long way in a very short amount of time and I am immensely proud of our achievements so far,

Our focus now is to serve our members through publishing their music, videos and blogs. We advertise their products and services and release their music digitally in all stores world wide.

Please take a few moments to check out Freedom for Musicians as it now exists:

Website ffmrecords.com

Our Community on Facebook

Corporate Marketing

For more information and to contact me, Roger Moisan, email rogermoisan@yahoo.co.uk or message me at Linkedin




Haunted Tillman Bus – Spirit communication through musical inspiration.



Spirit communication through musical inspiration. A short film featuring Tim Foster  aboard the infamous Floyd Tillman tour bus. A musician attracted the ghosts of famous country music personalities. A psychic translated the comments. A paranormal investigator recorded the actual spirit voices. “Fun and entertaining” “She loves you” “Can you see me?” “more please”

Tim Foster

You can download Tim’s latest album ‘Clearwater’ at apple music  and CD Baby 

Clearwater’s Story

Thank you for making this journey with me into the minds of musicians I have worked with. My first recording project was in 1987 at Began Sound in Ft. Worth, TX. The release on cassette tape featured Jackie Moore (guitar, vocals), Glenn Shelton (guitar), James Mayfield (drums), Drew Thomas (harmonica) and myself (bass), “Back to the Brazos” and “It’s So Peaceful” remain with me on quarter inch reel to this day.

We produced a series of RiverConcerts and performance venues to raise awareness of the impending dam project on the Paluxy River with the tour lasting four years. The second was in 1998 at Cedar Valley Community College studio, “Ode to a Fisherman” (poem by David Lilly), “Take Me Back To Texas”, “South of the Four Sixes” and “Old Time Cowhand” (poems by TL Thompson) was a class project where Bryan Clark was tasked in the role of producer and not allowed to play the drum tracks himself.

The day of the session, Bryan searched the corridor at the school and came back with a drummer to fill in. His name is not known for credit here. Hank Black (guitar, harmonica) on these tracks with myself (guitar, bass, vocals and songwriting)…Bryan got an “A” on the project. In the summer of 2001 with funds earned from a major construction project, I decided to fulfill a long standing promise to again record Jackie Moore (songwriter, acoustic guitar, vocals).

We had been performing off and on throughout the decade. We selected the Diamond D studio on the Brazos River in Granbury and did several sessions on one inch analog tape. With Dan Hodan (lead guitar, mandolin) and a couple of failed drummers and engineering challenges, we abandoned the project when Jackie first introduced “Poet of the Prairie”. We needed a better studio so I found The Kitchen Recording Studios Dallas, TX to record three songs.

We came out with eight. The studio percussionist was Jeff Hennon and JP handled the ProTools. Very excited about these results, we scheduled another RiverConcert with Rusty Wier and Tres Hombres to headline the show in October. We were on KNON radio and Songwriter Showcase on DCTV with Lisa Byrn. Then came the infamous 9/11 event.

I was begged to cancel the RiverConcert and called Rusty to ask if he was afraid to do it. You would not believe what he said. The RiverConcert production was a huge success. The attendance; however, was not. As producer, I retained this project and in 2003 reentered the studio and replaced Jackie’s vocals with my own version of “Poet of the Prairie”, “I’ve Crossed the Brazos” and “Goodbye to a River” (not included).

I added Tracy Fletcher (tambourine, background vocal) to “Poet” with the assistance of Mark Dove during the 2008 sessions in Azle, TX where “On My Way” and “Fisherman’s Paradise” (written by Jackie Moore not included in the 2001 sessions) were recorded with Mark Dove (piano, harmonica) and myself (vocals, acoustic guitar and bass). During my many travels developing a solo career, I have written about and performed in various unique places.

There remains songs which need recording. In Stephenville, TX, I met Clif Hunter whose poem “Does Anyone Really Care to Know?” captured a standing ovation at the Irish pub at Branson Landing. It also captured the spirits on the Floyd Tillman tour bus near Galveston where “they” gave me the nickname “Clearwater” hence the title to this album and email address. The DVD movie production by Paranormal Investigations of Texas (paratexas.com) titled “Haunted Tillman Bus” and the original Jackie Moore and The Roadrunners CD are available on request. Thank you again for listening…see y’all while ago.




The Red Planet Orchestra – Changing the Status Quo of Film Scores



Conceived and conducted by Vincent Rees, the Red Planet Orchestra combine classical composition with a contemporary structure of electronic ambient music.

With sound artist Pete Smith, the Red Planet Orchestra has accumulated a growing body of work both rich in invention and subtlety. A sound palette of future memories and past dreams. Each release has created a landscape of intense serenity.

Their debut album, Aurora Symphony, was warmly received and now a firm favourite among fans – All albums feature original artwork conceived by Belgium artist Nicolas Crombez.

The Red Planet Orchestra continue to compose music for emerging film soundtracks such as the brilliant ‘Gorka’

Albums
Aurora Symphony – 2013
Secrets of Eternity – 2013
We Breathe Together-2014
States of Space -2014
The Angry Silence -2014
Time of Dark Consequences – 2016
Contamination – 2016

Red Planet Orchestra
Contact Red Planet Orchestra at bandcamp.com



 

Richard Demy and the Arabic Euphonium



My mother Grew up outside of Beirut, Lebanon, and I had listened to a lot of Arabic music growing up.  I started playing euphonium in school and loved it so much that I focused on that for a while.  I heard Ibrahim Maalouf on the radio and it resonated with me so much that I looked him up, and got in touch with his father on Facebook.

Nassim his father studied at the Paris Conservatory under Maurice Andre, and invented the Arabic trumpet.  after passing some recordings back and forth, he helped guide me how to play the style properly.

This fall I have presented a lecture on how to modify all low brass instruments to be able to play the quarter-tone system, lectured at conferences, and have given masterclasses all over the US on the subject.  I should have my first CD out this summer.

B i o g r a p h y

Dr. Richard Demy is an international award winning musician who has performed all over the world.  He graduated  from the University of North Texas with his DMA under Dr. Brian Bowman, including other notable teachers – Dr Joseph Skillen, Don Palmire, and others.

Richard won the 2012 Leonard Falcone Euphonium Artist Solo Competition.  He was a finalist in the National Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition and  the International Tuba Euphonium Conference Euphonium Artist Division.

He performed a solo recital at the Kennedy Center as well as with with wind bands across the United States and Europe.  He has performed with symphonies and given over 100 recitals and master classes in many states in the USA

“My passion is to teach masterclasses and workshops on brass.  I focus on practice habits, with an emphasis on teaching technical elements from a musical paradigm.   Send me an email to discuss how I can assist your program ” 

Richard has worked hard to expand performance opportunities on the euphonium by publishing articles promoting lesser known genres featuring the euphonium, presenting recitals on historical instruments, and performing modern compositions with audience biofeedback.

opficleide
Richard Demy performing on the Ophicleide

He currently performs with the Lone Star Wind Orchestra based in Dallas, Texas and released his first album in June 2016.  You can read more about upcoming performances at DemyMusic.com.  Richard plays exclusively on a WILLSON 2900TA Euphonium.

Richard Demy
Contact Richard at Demymusic.com by clicking here



Introducing the stunning Martina Difonte



Whether it’s fashion, music or art, the most beautiful things are made in Italy. Martina Difonte is no exception with her rich, powerful vocals, poise and graceful movement, Martina is simply a star of Rome.

One of the most beautiful films ever made, in my humble opinion, is Giuseppe Tornature’s Cinema Paradiso.  Martina’s cover of the Ennio Morricone theme  from the movie is a perfect tribute to this timeless classic.

Martina Difonte
Visit Martina Difonte’s Official Page

Martina Difonte

 




Introducing the brilliant Lisa Ballew – Why Did You Wash Me Away?



The talent for writing and crafting a song aren’t always innate, but with Lisa Ballew it was something that was instinctive. Raised on the west coast of California, she connected with a deep-rooted musical family tree and began writing her own music at the early age of 13.

At 20 she ventured to Nashville to grow her musical prowess and feed and perform in a creative community. She eventually returned to the West Coast to be near family and continued to develop her art. She has crafted hundreds of songs that are ready for an audience.

“I think there was a period where my songs were cathartic and more for me…an outlet to express how I felt and saw life during both beautiful and difficult times. I finally had a realization that I had been stowing away my songs, my gifts and talents. I felt a strong sense that it was time for me to put it all out there. I needed to move forward in my musical journey and share my songs.”

That journey lead to the creation and release of “Ready For The Ride.” It showcases a pop sensibility and Lisa’s ability and passion to create songs that are relevant and commercial. This is just a glimpse of a deep catalog of songs waiting to be heard. The ride is just beginning…… 

Large H

Visit Lisa Here and check out the full album




Behind the Original Cover of “Bohemian Rhapsody”


Go to the profile of Daniel Nester

Queen’s mega-hit has been interpreted countless times. But who did it first?

Three years ago, we celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Queen classic “Bohemian Rhapsody,” complete with a reissue of the single’s original artwork for Record Store Day’s Black Friday and a Queen-endorsed brew, aptly named “Bohemian Lager,” made in — where else? — the Bohemia region of the Czech Republic.

Over the years, the Freddie Mercury-penned song has evolved from a radio staple to competition showcase for melismatic singers everywhere to something akin to public domain. There’s countless parodies: “Bohemian Carsody,” a car-themed parody by the all-female comedian troupe SketchShe, has racked up almost 30 million hits. There’s also ascience-themed “Bohemian Gravity,” College Humor’s “Bro-hemian Rhapsody,” “Bohemian Momsody,” the Minecraft-themed “Bohemian Craftsody,” and “Nintendohian Rhapsody.” And that’s just scratching the surface.

Interpretations of “Bohemian Rhapsody” also abound. Ukulele master Jake Shimabukuro’s TED Talk cover from 2010 has nine million views and counting. American Idol’s Adam Lambert’s rendition of “Bo Rhap” led to a job playing Mercury himself in a biopic set to release this year. Kanye West, the supremely self-confident rap artist and provocateur, opened his headlining set at Glastonbury Music Festival with a “Mama” heard ‘round the world in a performance that could charitably be described as pitch-imperfect. Remember Robert Wilkison? Arrested for driving while intoxicated in Alberta, Canada, he proclaimed his innocence with a full-throated “Bohemian Rhapsody” from the back of a squad car. He racked up 11 million hits. They did not let him go.

But who made the very first “Bohemian Rhapsody” cover?

Perhaps 1982’s recording by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra?

Or maybe the 1987 cover by Bad News, the comedy metal band?

Good guesses, but both are wrong.

The very first “Bohemian Rhapsody” cover was recorded for a Top of The Popscompilation volume and released in December 1975, three months after the original song was released on the airwaves. Not to be confused with the television show by the same name, the Top of The Pops series were budget-priced compilations that featured studio musicians and singers recreating chart-toppers, and usually featured a scantily clad model as the album art. We’re talking everyone from the Supremes to the Sex Pistols. Found on Top of The Pops #49, the “Bohemian Rhapsody” cover was recorded at De Lane Lea Studios, next to Wembley Stadium, where — it might be noted — Queen recorded early demos for tracks like “Keep Yourself Alive.”

Recently I tracked down Tony Rivers, one of the four Top of The Pops singers who recorded that first “Bohemian Rhapsody” cover. He was also the vocal arranger on the sessions, a thankless task for which he was well-prepared: Rivers’ long and varied career includes working on tracks from early 60s vocal groups Harmony Grass and the Castaways, recordings with Pink Floyd and INXS, and singing backup for Cliff Richard and Elton John — all of which he’s written about in his book, I’m Nearly Famous: The Tales of a Likely Lad.

Rivers was kind enough to let me pick his brain over email about the original “Bohemian Rhapsody” cover.

This interview has been lightly edited and condensed for clarity.


Everyone covers or parodies “Bohemian Rhapsody” these days — from the Muppets, Phish, Flaming Lips, William Shatner, Zac Brown Band, Kanye West — everyone climbs Bo Rhap Mountain, it seems.

Well, not many could manage to put this together, least of all Kanye West!

But you were the first.

I have always assumed that [it was], mainly because harmony wasn’t many singers’ strong point at that time, and it was the most complicated arrangement to learn in a few days and record.

Tony Rivers in the 1970s.

A few days? The original famously took three, four weeks.

There were very few around who could have done it that quickly. It was a bit easier for us four, all coming up with vocal group backgrounds. All four of us sang on “Bohemian Rhapsody.” We usually took a day to lay down lead and backing vocal tracks, and would be on our way home by 11pm. Not this time!

So it wasn’t easy to do, then.

No. With due modesty it was difficult for us because of the time restriction — maybe two or three days to live with it (once the committee had chosen it).

By “committee” you mean the people at Top of The Pops?

A small group of Hallmark employees, along with producer Bruce Baxter, would sit down prior to the planned sessions and choose the potential hits. That, of course, was the secret to the label’s success. I have no idea what their thoughts were in choosing “Bohemian Rhapsody” other than “what an amazing record!”

The cover is pretty much perfect, note-for-note. How did you pull that off?

As usual, I had the job of sorting out the vocal arrangement. I had to listen and memorize the parts. John Perry and Ken Gold were also listening and were both assigned lead lines that suited their voices, which they did brilliantly I think. Oh, and let’s not forget the late Stu Calver, who was the very high voice on the Roger Taylor parts — the “Gallileo”’s and so on.

Normally this wouldn’t be too big a deal, but with this song, I had to sit for hours at home listening, making notes, and memorizing vocal lines — apart from the other tracks we had to do that day!

The time-consuming job of layering track after track of vocals ’til we got the sound and the voicing right seemed to take forever. But in the end, it had been a great opportunity to find out how that song was put together.

I’m still trying to wrap my head around you doing all of this in a few days, to be honest.

The harmony parts were obviously part of the problem, but they are not difficult harmonies. The problem was lack of familiarity with the whole thing. We could copy sections, piece by piece. The other problem was the time needed to achieve a similar “sound.” That kind of mass tracking takes time, and wasn’t usually available in big lumps. This was something with many lumps!

We were helped greatly by the fact that all three of us had good range in our voices with JP and Stu blessed with fantastic falsetto range.

I believe we spent the early part and the rest of the day, singing whatever vocals or harmonies needed on the other songs that had been selected.

You worked on other songs at the same time?

Memory tells me at around 7pm we started on Bo Rhap, bit by bit, until each section sounded good, and added voices until it did. We finished and hit the A406 [a main London road] around 7 the next morning in a daze, in rush hour traffic, with “Gallileo”s running round our heads.

I have nothing but admiration for the man who created it: Freddie Mercury. What a record.

A bit different from something like [The Sweet’s] “Little Willie!”

The original version made a splash, of course, but the TOTP version made headlines as well. Kenny Everett, who famously played the test pressing of the original track, also played your cover.

Kenny Everett was a big name at that time , and decided to see if the listeners could tell which version had taken months and a fortune to record, and which was done in a few hours on a budget album! He played our version and Queen’s, cutting between the two, asking “Can you tell which one’s the ten-bob version, and which one cost six million quid to make?”

Did you ever hear from the Queen camp regarding your cover? I know you worked with Cliff Richard for quite some time, and Freddie Mercury and he were friends.

Ken Gold was introduced to Freddie whilst on an Elton John tour of the USA. Ken decided to ask Freddie what he thought about “that cover.” He looked pensive, then added, “Hmm, an interesting version!”

I did meet Brian May once. He said, “Hi, Tony! Roger and I used to go to see you live at Loughborough Uni/College, and you were a very big influence on our harmonies!” Not bad, eh?



Introducing Luca Brassy



For the past 13 years, Luca Brassy, born and raised in Upstate NY, has been building a reputation in the Tri-State area as one of the hottest emcees in the region.  His journey really started in entertainment through professional wrestling at age 13.  By the time he turned 16, Luca was running his own professional wrestling training center (24/7 Wrestling Productions LLC) in Upstate NY.

Due to things out of his own control, 24/7 closed its doors in the summer of 2003.  From there, Brassy had a hard time finding himself again until he discovered his love for writing and music in 2004.  In October 2004, he met Jgreen Moneytalkz who has been producing his music ever since.

Luca Brassy has performed at numerous cities and states including Schenectady, Albany, Glens Falls, Syracuse, Amsterdam, Rochester, Pittsfield, Pittsburgh, Massachusetts, Buffalo, Newport Rhode Island, Brooklyn, Bronx NY, Manhattan, Staten Island, Ardmore PA, Uniontown Alabama, Birmingham, Atlanta GA, Marshall NC, and Memphis TN among others and has been building a name for himself based on his politically and socially oriented music.

Among other great accolades, he has opened for several well known emcees such as Rakim and Lil Kim.  Brassy is now moving in a new direction with his music and putting his old school lyrical mentality to use with his club vibe which has brought him a whole new fan base as well as a different kind of recognition.

Brassy’s first mixtape was released in 2006 titled “The Project: Stereotyped”, and his first full length album “The Narration: The Heart of a Champion” in 2010.  A remake of that album was released Through Tate Music Group in 2014 titled simply “The Heart of a Champion.”   Luca was recently signed to Sony RED where he released 2 singles “Like That” and “3000” (produced by Younglord).

With this, he continues to be active around his own community as well as others.  He continues to grind and make new contacts in radio, magazine, film, blogs, etc.  He most recently was signed to CNY Mode modeling agency based in Syracuse NY!  In music, his newest single “Lose Your Mind” was recorded in Los Angeles with the music video being shot in ATL.  Brassy stays on the grind and is always active in his music and all business endeavors.  Stay tuned for the latest on Luca Brassy!  POW!!!

Luca Brassy
Visit lucabreassy.com

 

Luca Brassy