Intuitive Guitar – Major Scale Modes. A fantastic new App for guitarists



Why is it that many video courses, guitar lessons, guitarists, apps and tutorials explain the concept of modes for guitar over and over again? Because they are very useful of course, but somewhat fail as one usually ends up with fretboard diagrams filled with dots and patterns and it all seems like a big intellectual challenge to memorize all positions at once, all keys, all strings… so many different combinations, and how to make them sound musical and flow through them without sounding like a robot is going up and down a scale?

We believe the solution is learning through intuition and repetition with carefully designed objective oriented practice routines. Time is important, so optimizing your practice time is essential to make progress and stop wasting time.

This approach to learning the modes of the major scale for guitar is simple and effective, just play along a practice routine for 10 minutes a day and the whole fretboard will start to open up for you. The routines cover all seven modes of the major scale parallel to each other in the key of C. We are approaching guitar fretboard visualization in 3-string shapes that cover only one octave, which makes them easy to manipulate, instead of large 6-string shapes, CAGED, 3 notes per string or other conventional shapes. This process will allow you to always keep in mind the intervallic relationship of the note you are playing against the root. Basic modal theory is included and we focus on the 7 modes of the major scale: Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian.

Features:
– New effortless approach to learning music theory and skills
– Fly through the 7 Modes of the Major Scale
– 21 well designed guitar practice routines for daily practice
– 14 Backing tracks/modal loops with advanced audio pitch-shifting, tempo variations, and an equalizer
– Fully featured tab section with zoom, fast scrolling, loops, tempo and tonality change
– Modal Music Theory
– Built-in Metronome

We think that in today’s digital world privacy is of the utmost importance. You can read the complete policy here: http://www.amparosoft.com/privacy

NOTE: If you run into any issues, have questions or suggestions, please email us to amparosoft@gmail.com

All content is property of AmparoSoft
All music is composed and played by Otto Reina

Download The App Here




A Fantastic Musical Project In Uganda by Innocent Wodonya

FFM’s  Uganda Ambassador,  Innocent Wodonya is raising money to help young musicians in Uganda. They need to buy instruments to continue the fantastic work already being done by the David Kiwana Wind Orchestra. Please visit their GoFund Site and pledge a few pounds/dollars/yen to help them give music to young people in Uganda.
Innocent Wodonya
Innocent Wodonya 
“We are a starting a wind classics band and we intend to give chance to our players  to play music and we really need your support for us to do it please whatever you give will help give a chance to one African child  to play music .
Thank you all  friends around the world .
Help spread the word!”
 Innocent Wodonya

The international language of music spreads love and friendship around the world and FFM Records will ultimately record and distribute a digital album for our Ugandan friends to create a sustainable source of income for the future.
The music education outreach that music provides is a priceless lifeline for many Ugandans creating  opportunities for personal development much needed in the area.

Please help us help these wonderful musicians be the best they can.
Roger Moisan LTCL PGCE
(CEO Freedom For Musicians)

Please Visit our GoFund Page



Why do we learn to play the recorder at school?


400 years ago, the recorder was so popular that people were writing concertos for it. Now, we associate it with primary school music lessons. We’re here to explain why…

Long before it was used as a teaching instrument, Renaissance and Baroque composers like Monteverdi, Purcell and Bach loved to compose for this small, whistle-like instrument. Here’s Vivaldi’s lovely Recorder Concerto in C:


Back then, all recorders would have been made from wood and ivory – a far cry from today’s primary school plastic numbers.

So why did we start using them to play ‘Mary Had a Little Lamb’?

Fast forward to the 1900s, when Carl Orff – that’s the German composer who wrote Carmina Burana (the cantata which includes the epic ‘O Fortuna’) – thought it would be a great idea to use the soprano recorder as a teaching tool.

Aside from writing excellent music that would later be poached by The X Factor, Orff became instrumental in shaping music education theory in the 20th century.

His Orff Schulwerk encouraged learning music through rhythm and creative thinking, methods he thought to be much more effective (and enjoyable) than learning by repetition.

The work also called for a wider range of simple, easy-to-play instruments, specifically those with a similar vocal range to a child. Orff figured that if a child could sing the notes they were playing, they’d be more likely to understand it.

To him, the soprano recorder’s lack of strings, reeds, bow – or need to develop a good embouchure in order to make a half-decent sound on it – made it the perfect instrument to inspire children to play music. You could say the same for other teaching instruments, like the glockenspiel or the tambourine.

So do people still play the recorder seriously?

Sure they do! Recorders can be as small and simple as the soprano recorder, and as big and practically impossible to play as the contrabass recorder (there’s also the sub-contrabass recorder, which is even scarier). It looks like this:

Contrabass recorder

Imagine trying to play ‘Mary Had a Little Lamb’ on THAT.

Here’s the Palisander Quartet, making the recorder look advanced and awesome:

Palisander: The Nightmare Concerto
Palisander Recorder Ensemble playing Vivaldi’s ‘The Nightmare Concerto’, arranged by Miriam Nerval.



Listen to Mozart played on Mozart’s VERY OWN piano


Please watch this amazing video of pianist Robert Levin playing Mozart’s piano sonatas on Mozart’s ACTUAL PIANO.

Last year, pianist and musicologist Robert Levin was announced as the first Hogwood Fellow of the Academy of Ancient Music. So, we filmed him playing on Mozart’s very own instrument.

The fortepiano, from around 1782, was used by Mozart for both composition and performance from 1785 until his death in 1791.

The piano was originally made by Anton Walter, one of the most famous Viennese piano makers of Mozart’s time. It is two octaves shorter than a modern piano, and is much lighter and smaller than modern pianos, weighing only 85kg. It’s also much smaller than a modern piano, at just 2.23m long.

It can currently be found in Salzburg, where Robert Levin is using it to record Mozart’s piano sonatas.

“The voyage and discovery of playing on period instruments is to move in a world – physical, emotional and aesthetic – that is inhabited by the geniuses that wrote this music. It brings us very, very close to them,” said Levin.

“So sitting down at Mozart’s piano, sitting down at an organ which Bach played himself, you understand things about the weight of the keys going down and the repetition and the balance in sound.

“And all of these things bring you very, very close to the music and make you say ‘A-ha, that’s why it’s written that way’, which is not the kind of thing you’re going to get if you’re playing on the standard instruments that are being manufactured today.”



How to Write Songs That Get Stuck in People’s Heads



If you’ve seen Easy A, you probably remember the scene where Emma Stone receives a card that plays Natasha Bedingfield’s “Pocketful of Sunshine” and how Stone’s character hates the song – at first. Flash forward to a few days later, and she can’t stop singing it.

There are songs that we can’t stand, yet can’t get out of our heads. There are also songs that we love and feel addicted to. For whatever reason, songs get lodged in our brains – and often stay there for a maddeningly long time.

Labled “earworms” by the scientific community, it’s been suggested that these ditties hang around longer in musicians’ minds than non-musicians’. What makes a song have such a huge impact on our brains? Below, we’ll run through the four main components of creating a catchy song that you can’t get out of your head, even if you want to. 

But first, let’s revisit that clip of Emma Stone and “Pocketful of Sunshine” as a prime example of earworm invasion:

1. Song structure

There are a variety of song structures often used in today’s popular music. Formats such as ABABCB (A = verse, B = chorus, C = bridge or solo) and AABA (A = verse and B = bridge) are very common and easy for listeners to remember.

While songs don’t necessarily have to follow any specific layout, catchy songs generally tend to follow one of the more common structures listed above or a variation of some sort. Finding the right balance between meeting listeners’ expectations and throwing in something surprising is a surefire way to create an earworm.

2. Lyrics

In today’s music market, many fantastic songwriters write elaborate lyrics. That said, the majority of catchy songs feature smaller amounts of words or words that are easy to remember, and often repeat portions (see ABABCB above), which, in turn, create a difficult song to get out of your head.

When the focus is on the song’s hook and chorus, keeping the fancy lyrics for the verses will lure listeners in and leave them humming the most memorable parts throughout the day.

3. Chord progressions and melodies

There are certain progressions that create addictive songs. Similar to song structure, catchy chord progressions must balance expectations and artistic expression. By tying the simplicity of commonality to the unexpected, listeners are drawn into the comfort of what they know and the excitement of what lies ahead.

Building off the chord progressions, the melody is usually what we retain in our heads. A catchy melody is generally upbeat, though there are some hauntingly beautiful melancholy melodies out there as well. Even the most irritating songs have a well-written line that our minds can’t escape. A melody that is both interesting and recognizable is a key component of a catchy song.

4. Production quality

This last category is dependent on what exactly you do in the music industry. Are you writing for other artists? If so, the production quality may be out of your hands. If you’re in charge of the production of your song, however, this absolutely contributes to its popularity. Though there’s an audience for less polished recordings, not many people want to listen to a poorly recorded album version of a song that sounds like a demoIn order to have a catchy song that appeals to the masses, the production quality must be high. This isn’t to say that someone who can’t afford to record in a professional studio hasn’t written a catchy song, but a high-quality recording of the song will open up a larger market and make it more likely to receive favorable reviews and airplay.

Whether it’s a song you love or can’t stand, you have to admit there’s great science behind songwriting. Creating something that piques a large audience’s interest, even those who consider it a guilty pleasure, is a tough task to take on. For a fun exercise, try figuring out what makes that song you can’t get out of your head so addictive. If you’re a songwriter, you could even adapt that writing format and see what you come up with.

What do you think makes a catchy song? Let us know in the comments below!

Kathleen Parrish is a singer and songwriter from Seattle, WA. While she specializes in lyrics, she enjoys writing short stories, poetry, and journalism. For more information, please visit www.kathleenparrish.com.


Product Review – Zoom H1 with Accessory Pack, Matte Black £69.00 inc VAT

X/Y Recording Made Simple

The Zoom H1 Digital Field Recorder’s built-in X/Y microphone provides two matched unidirectional microphones set at a 90 degree angle relative to one another, optimum for most stereo recording applications. For X/Y or other types of recording, you can connect a pair of external microphones or line level signal to the H1’s Mic/Line Input mini phone jack.

The Ins and Outs

The H1 Mic/Line Input is a stereo ⅛” mini phone jack that can accept two mic- and/or line-level signals. Condenser microphones requiring Plug-In Power (2.5 volts) can be connected to this jack. The H1 Line/Headphones Output is a stereo ⅛” phone jack with a dedicated volume control. Headphones can be connected here for private monitoring. There’s also a built-in speaker on the back panel for fast monophonic monitoring of the recorded signal without the need to make any connections. The H1’s USB port provides a digital output of the stereo mix and allows data to be sent to and from your computer. From there, it can be imported into editing software such as the supplied WaveLab LE. It also allows the H1 to be used as a 2-in/2-out audio interface and USB microphone, as well as a microSD card reader.

Auto Level and Low Cut Filter

Overload and distortion are prevented with the H1’s Auto Level function that sets input gain automatically (input level can be set manually, too). The H1 also provides a built-in low cut filter for the elimination of pops, wind noise, blowing, and other kinds of low frequency rumble.

WAV and MP3 Support

The Zoom H1 records audio in both WAV and MP3 formats. The WAV files recorded by the H1 can be either 16- or 24-bit, with sampling rates of 44.1, 48, or 96 kHz, and are automatically time-stamped, making them Broadcast Wave Format (BWF) compliant – ideal for journalists and other professional media.

Battery Life and Recording

The H1 Digital Field Recorder requires just a single AA battery – offering up to 10 hours of operation, even during continuous recording. You can also power the H1 from any standard wall socket using the optional AD-17 AC adapter. The H1 records directly to microSD and microSDHC cards, up to 32 gigabytes.

High Quality Video Audio

The compact, lightweight H1 is perfect for use on a video or DSLR camera. The remarkable depth and clarity of sound achieved by the stereo X/Y mic design brings additional realism and depth to HD video. By combining the H1 with a DSLR video camera, you can create a professional video system with high-quality sound.

Included Accessory Pack

Additionally, the Zoom H1 comes with a useful bunch of accessories that allows you to get the most out of the Zoom H1 recorder. Included is a windscreen that minimises wind noise in demanding weather conditions, helping to retain the audio quality from the H1. The adjustable desktop tripod stabilises your recorder when on the move, or at home, and minimises handle noise to ensure clean recordings. The soft case ensures protection for your H1 during transport and storage. The accessory pack also includes an AC adapter, USB cable, and mic stand clip adapter, allowing you to charge the recorder, and seamlessly transfer files onto a computer or storage device.

What’s Included In Accessory Pack

  • Windscreen
  • Mic stand clip adapter
  • Adjustable desktop tripod
  • Soft case
  • AC adapter
  • USB cable

Reviews

“The Zoom H1 Handy Recorder is unquestionably a bargain” – PC Advisor

“For such a small unit it really can do some impressive recording and will definitely get the job done. Whether you are recording an interview or live music the H1 would be a great tool.” – Videomaker Magazine

Features

  • Built-in 90° X/Y stereo mic
  • Stereo ⅛” Mic/Line Input mini phone jack with Plug-in power (2.5V)
  • Stereo ⅛” Phones/Line Output jack with dedicated volume control
  • Built-in reference speaker for fast monitoring
  • Backlit LCD display
  • Records directly to microSD and microSDHC cards up to 32 GB
  • Supports up to 24-bit/96 kHz audio in BWF-compliant WAV or a variety of MP3 formats
  • Auto Level for automatic control of input level
  • Low-cut filter for elimination of wind noise and rumble
  • Up to 99 marks per recording
  • USB port for data transfer to computer and use as an audio interface and USB microphone
  • SD card reader function
  • Mounts directly to tripod, or to mic stand or DSLR with optional adapter
  • Runs on only 1 standard AA alkaline or NiMH rechargeable battery
  • Up to 10 hours of operation with a single AA alkaline battery

Specifications

  • Simultaneous recording tracks: 2
  • Simultaneous playback tracks: 2
  • Functions: Lo-cut Filter, Auto REC Level, Marker
  • Recording/playback format:
    • WAV: 44.1 / 48 / 96kHz, 16- / 24-bit
    • MP3: 44.1kHz 48/56/64/80/96/112/128/160/192/224/256/320kbps
  • A/D conversion: 24-bit, 128x oversampling
  • D/A conversion: 24-bit, 128x oversampling
  • Signal processing: 32-bit
  • Recording media: microSD card (16MB – 2GB), microSDHC card (4GB – 32GB)
  • Display: 127 segment custom LCD (with backlight)
  • Built-in stereo mic: Unidirectional condenser
  • Gain: 0 to +39dB
  • Minimum gain with digital attenuation: -28dB
  • Maximum sound pressure level: 120dB SPL
  • Mic/line input: 1/8″ stereo phone jack (Plug-in power supported)
  • Input Impedance: 2kΩ (Input level: 0 to -39dBm)
  • Phones/line output: 1/8″ stereo phone jack
  • Output load impedance: 10kΩ or more
  • Rated output level: -10dBm
  • Phones output level: 20mW + 20mW into 32Ω load
  • Output load impedance: 10kΩ or more
  • Rated output level: -10dBm
  • USB interface:
    • Type: Mini-B type (USB 2.0 High Speed compatible), Mass Storage Class operation
    • Format: 44.1 kHz/16-bit or 48 kHz/16-bit
  • Power requirements: Alkaline or Ni-MH AA battery x 1, or AC adapter (AD-17, USB to AC type)
  • Battery life (alkaline batteries): 10 hours (MP3), 9.5 hours (WAV)
  • Dimensions: 44(W) x 136(D) x 31(H)mm
  • Weight: 60g (without batteries)
Zoom H1
Zoom H1 Handy Recorder £69.00 inc VAT



 

Freedom for Musicians – From concept, to birth, to flourishing brain child

Roger Moisan, Founder and Director, Freedom for Musicians
Roger Moisan, Founder/Director, Freedom for Musicians

At the beginning of 2016, I had an idea that I wanted to do something digitally/online that would help fellow musicians and be something that I could give back to the industry. My legacy if you like.

Now, I had no idea what it would be or how to do it so I set about learning the tech, digital marketing and website building. This was quite daunting for this fifty-something dinosaur but I quickly discovered that this modern sorcery was actually pretty easy. (Big thanks to DBL and SFM )

Hence, Freedom for Musicians was born. To be honest, the early manifestation of FFM was quite embarrassing in hindsight with no real identity and clumsy tech. However, I persevered and we now have a thriving online music magazine, independent record label and growing community of nearly 5000 musicians worldwide. FFM has Ambassadors representing Uganda, Kenya, Ghana, Canada, India, Azerbaijan, Czech Republic, Italy, USA, UK, Jersey CI and Indonesia. My initial concept has come a long way in a very short amount of time and I am immensely proud of our achievements so far,

Our focus now is to serve our members through publishing their music, videos and blogs. We advertise their products and services and release their music digitally in all stores world wide.

Please take a few moments to check out Freedom for Musicians as it now exists:

Website ffmrecords.com

Our Community on Facebook

Corporate Marketing

For more information and to contact me, Roger Moisan, email rogermoisan@yahoo.co.uk or message me at Linkedin




It’s been 50 years since Hendrix’s ‘Electric Ladyland’ blew our minds


Go to the profile of Martin Johnson

The double album blurred the lines between musical genres and refused to let blackness be narrowcast.

For a kid born in 1960, I came to Jimi Hendrix’s music late. While I fondly recall lurking outside the door of my sister’s bedroom to sneak a listen of the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, and loving the iconic introductory guitar on the Temptations’ “My Girl” emanating from my brother’s room, I can’t claim that I stood in the hallway of my childhood home, in Chicago, playing air guitar to the power chords that introduced “Purple Haze.”

Then I went college. One night in 1979, probably in between Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon and the Velvet Underground’s Loaded, a friend put on Hendrix’s Electric Ladyland and, like millions of other listeners, I was absolutely transfixed. At the time, I’d known Hendrix for remarkable three- and four-minute singles like “Manic Depression” and “Foxy Lady.” But hearing Electric Ladyland, whose 10th anniversary coincided with my freshman year, and whose 50th anniversary is upon us, was a game-changer.

On a personal level, it was an affirmation of sorts. As an African American with a diverse sonic appetite dating back to childhood, I’d been called an “Uncle Tom” by junior high classmates for liking Steely Dan more than B.T. Express, a taunt that left me with physical and emotional scars. Electric Ladyland confirmed that my interests were, and always had been, cool. Way cool. The album had a little bit of everything.

The jazz aficionado in me loved “Rainy Day, Dream Away,” while my inner blues lover dug Jimi’s take on Earl King’s “Come On (Let the Good Times Roll).” The rock head banger inside me loved “Crosstown Traffic.” By the time the recording ended, with a searing cover of Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower” and a fiery “Voodoo Child (Slight Return),” I knew I’d found my church.

So had a lot of people, especially African American listeners and musicians. More than any recording up to that point, Electric Ladyland refused to allow blackness to be narrowcast, and presented a vision of a diverse, accomplished African American future. Which is why it’s as powerful in 2018 as it was half a century ago.

Electric Ladyland’s inside cover. (Reprise Records)

In1969, legendary rock critic Robert Christgau raved that “no previous rock album flowed like [Electric Ladyland], and while jazz albums often support as many contrasting sonic moods, Louis Armstrong himself didn’t match Hendrix’s appetite for sound effects and general silliness. His spaced-out spirituality is the fullest musicalization of ‘psychedelic’ ever accomplished.” In 2017, Pitchfork ranked the recording number 11 in its top 200 recordings of the sixties. In his assessment, Nate Patrin wrote, “Hendrix was a master of both the boundless potential and the immediate simplicity of rock.” Yet this praise only skims the surface.

Electric Ladyland was released in October of ’68, a little less than a year before Hendrix’s landmark appearance at Woodstock, where his solo guitar version of “The Star Spangled Banner” would solidify his place in the pantheon of American musicians. It’s fairly easy to draw a direct line from him to other great guitarists like Robin Trower, Joe Satriani, Ernie Isley, Prince, and Stevie Ray Vaughan, as well as shredders in different genres like Robert Randolph (gospel/Americana), Gary Clark (blues/rock) Eddie Hazel (funk), and Mary Halvorson (jazz), just to name a few. But Electric Ladyland’s impact goes deeper than just the work of a virtuoso guitar player.

“I think that the impact Hendrix’s work had on me was the sheer power of his visionary imagination,” Vernon Reid, a guitar wizard and leader of the group Living Colour, tells Timeline via email:

Hendrix painted murals of sound, a cosmology of artistic freedom. He didn’t seem to have any boundaries to his expression. Even as he was deeply connected to blues, he was not hemmed in by that traditional structure. He managed to find a way to be free within it. Jimi became a capital-O Obsession. The opener of Electric Ladyland, “And the Gods Made Love,” was hardcore psychedelia, total aural strangeness, a preamble to a dream question, “Have You Ever Been to Electric Ladyland?” The answer was decidedly NO, but I really, REALLY wanted to go.

Hendrix’s vision, his uncanny ability to be rooted in many genres yet see beyond aesthetic boundaries, is what makes Electric Ladyland an inspirational touchstone for so many artists. Reid notes that his group’s 1990 recording Time’s Up owes a significant debt to the Hendrix classic, adding that “a record like Prince’s 1999 or Sign ‘O’ the Times doesn’t happen without the existence of Electric Ladyland.” Neither, he says, does Lenny Kravitz’s Let Love Rule or Miles Davis’s Agharta or Funkadelic’s Maggot Brain or any seventies-era tunes by the Isley Brothers. And of course, he says, “the DNA of rock from Seattle is suffused with what Hendrix accomplished with Electric Ladyland, which makes all the more sense, given that Seattle was Hendrix’s hometown.

 

Electric Ladyland’s influence can be heard on recent recordings by Solange (left), Kamasi Washington (center), and Nicole Mitchell (right), despite the fact that none are rock albums. (Saint Records/Brainfeeder/FPE Records)

Evidently, Electric Ladyland’s DNA still runs strong in the current generation of musical artists. Or perhaps the confluence of Barack Obama’s presidency and the rise of Black Lives Matter have played a part in supporting a vision for a strong African American future. Either way, several recent, sprawling, epic recordings suggest a sonic itinerary that includes the multi-dimensional realm of Electric Ladyland.

A Seat at the Table, Solange Knowles’s 2016 exploration of contemporary black womanhood, draws on many styles, such as jazz, gospel, and hip-hop, and reimagines each to create a polyglot rhythm-and-blues sound that both is rooted in the past and reaches far into the future. Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp a Butterfly, a 2015 meditation on African American masculinity, features a broad base of musical styles and goes so deep on the jazz tip that it provided the breakout moment for saxophonist Kamasi Washington, who then released his own appropriately titled recording, The Epic, which presents an Afro-futurist vision.

Flutist and composer Nicole Mitchell had her breakout in 2017 with Mandorla Awakening II: Emerging Worlds, which depicts a future world where technology and nature coexist peacefully. Mitchell, who was based in Chicago for more than 20 years, draws on blues, house music, and gospel, blending them seamlessly into an improvised context. None of these recordings are rock albums, so they haven’t been presented in the lineage of Electric Ladyland. But it isn’t hard to see their eclecticism and vision in a similar mold as Hendrix’s timeless double LP.

“Jimi Hendrix was lighting a pathway for, and setting a challenge to, subsequent generations of artists,” says Reid. “He showed me and many others what was possible to create and make happen. The greatest lesson of Electric Ladyland for me was finding myself.”

Back in college, while looking at the album’s liner notes (remember those?), I noticed that Hendrix was credited not just with producing the record but directing it, title that’s rarely used in recorded music. That’s because it isn’t simply a collection of songs; it’s one of the first concept recordings in popular music. What that concept is, of course, varies from ear to ear, listener to listener, artist to artist. “It wasn’t just slopped together,” Hendrix has said. “Every little thing you hear means something.”



What A Wonderful World-A Powerful Message From The Great Herb Alpert



“Though there is too much poverty, too many wars, too much hatred and divisiveness in the world, we believe that with love, understanding, kindness, compassion, warmth, respect and humaneness, this beautiful world of ours could be a much better place for every woman, man, child and all of the animals, creatures and nature that live on our planet.”

All proceeds are dedicated to the Louis Armstrong Foundation

The Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, Inc. was founded and funded by Louis Armstrong in 1969 to give back to the world “some of the goodness he received.”

The Foundation is dedicated to perpetuating the legacies of Louis and Lucille Armstrong throughout the world with the following initiatives:

  1. Foster programs, workshops and lectures in schools on the history of music education, as well as supporting access to instruments and scholarships.
  2. Assist and contribute to schools and libraries for events and programs designed to educate students about jazz.
  3. Sponsor programs at all school levels to aid students in developing musical skills.
  4. Support music therapy.

His will left the estate and Foundation to his beloved wife Lucille

For more information about the Louis Armstrong Education Foundation please contact:

Jackie Harris
P.O. Box 3115
New York, NY 10163-3115
Email: permissions@louisarmstrongfoundation.org


Freedom for Musicians Supports – Save East Sussex Music Service

East Sussex County Council are proposing to cut the instrumental service.

East Sussex Music provides music tuition for over 7000 children in 92% of East Sussex schools.

More than 3000 children have tuition from the instrumental service.  Their inspirational teachers enable children from low income backgrounds, from rural areas, in challenging circumstances or with special educational needs or disability to learn.  Their progress and achievement in learning an instrument and participating with others also helps them develop life skills to enable them grow their aspirations in all walks of life .

Thousands of lives have been inspired and transformed by this service.  Don’t let our children pay for East Sussex County Council’s financial choices brought about by government cuts to public services.

What can you do?

Sign the petition

Join the Facebook campaign

Write to your MP or councillor to demand that East Sussex County Council  look at the many alternative proposals already submitted

Share your personal story of how learning a musical instrument changed your life or the lives of family and friends

Tweet your story using #SaveESMS #saveourservice @eastsussexCC

Rally with us at one of our events

Bang the drum for music

Sussex by the Sea

28 April, 4pm, Eastbourne Bandstand

Join BBC Principal Trumpet player, Alan Thomas in rousing choruses of Sussex by the Sea.

Protest

30 April, 9:30am County Hall Lewes

Samba and more.  Bring a drum and join parents and students as Cllr Bob Standley decides #thinkagainbob

May Day Parade

7 May, 11am, Hyde Gardens Eastbourne

We lead the parade with bands and more to march through the town ending at the Wish Tower slopes for picnics and speeches

Ouse day

I July, 2pm, River Ouse Lewes

Help us ‘rock the boat’ at the raft race

Details on the website

Contact us:
saveeastsussexmusic@gmail.com
www.saveeastsussexmusic.com

#SaveESMS #ThinkAgainBob