The Latest from the Red Planet Orchestra


Somewhere on this earth exists a secret place isolated from the rest of the world. The last untouched paradise where we live the same way from where we started. We are, Humanity!

More About The Red Planet Orchestra




Haunted Tillman Bus – Spirit communication through musical inspiration.



Spirit communication through musical inspiration. A short film featuring Tim Foster  aboard the infamous Floyd Tillman tour bus. A musician attracted the ghosts of famous country music personalities. A psychic translated the comments. A paranormal investigator recorded the actual spirit voices. “Fun and entertaining” “She loves you” “Can you see me?” “more please”

Tim Foster

You can download Tim’s latest album ‘Clearwater’ at apple music  and CD Baby 

Clearwater’s Story

Thank you for making this journey with me into the minds of musicians I have worked with. My first recording project was in 1987 at Began Sound in Ft. Worth, TX. The release on cassette tape featured Jackie Moore (guitar, vocals), Glenn Shelton (guitar), James Mayfield (drums), Drew Thomas (harmonica) and myself (bass), “Back to the Brazos” and “It’s So Peaceful” remain with me on quarter inch reel to this day.

We produced a series of RiverConcerts and performance venues to raise awareness of the impending dam project on the Paluxy River with the tour lasting four years. The second was in 1998 at Cedar Valley Community College studio, “Ode to a Fisherman” (poem by David Lilly), “Take Me Back To Texas”, “South of the Four Sixes” and “Old Time Cowhand” (poems by TL Thompson) was a class project where Bryan Clark was tasked in the role of producer and not allowed to play the drum tracks himself.

The day of the session, Bryan searched the corridor at the school and came back with a drummer to fill in. His name is not known for credit here. Hank Black (guitar, harmonica) on these tracks with myself (guitar, bass, vocals and songwriting)…Bryan got an “A” on the project. In the summer of 2001 with funds earned from a major construction project, I decided to fulfill a long standing promise to again record Jackie Moore (songwriter, acoustic guitar, vocals).

We had been performing off and on throughout the decade. We selected the Diamond D studio on the Brazos River in Granbury and did several sessions on one inch analog tape. With Dan Hodan (lead guitar, mandolin) and a couple of failed drummers and engineering challenges, we abandoned the project when Jackie first introduced “Poet of the Prairie”. We needed a better studio so I found The Kitchen Recording Studios Dallas, TX to record three songs.

We came out with eight. The studio percussionist was Jeff Hennon and JP handled the ProTools. Very excited about these results, we scheduled another RiverConcert with Rusty Wier and Tres Hombres to headline the show in October. We were on KNON radio and Songwriter Showcase on DCTV with Lisa Byrn. Then came the infamous 9/11 event.

I was begged to cancel the RiverConcert and called Rusty to ask if he was afraid to do it. You would not believe what he said. The RiverConcert production was a huge success. The attendance; however, was not. As producer, I retained this project and in 2003 reentered the studio and replaced Jackie’s vocals with my own version of “Poet of the Prairie”, “I’ve Crossed the Brazos” and “Goodbye to a River” (not included).

I added Tracy Fletcher (tambourine, background vocal) to “Poet” with the assistance of Mark Dove during the 2008 sessions in Azle, TX where “On My Way” and “Fisherman’s Paradise” (written by Jackie Moore not included in the 2001 sessions) were recorded with Mark Dove (piano, harmonica) and myself (vocals, acoustic guitar and bass). During my many travels developing a solo career, I have written about and performed in various unique places.

There remains songs which need recording. In Stephenville, TX, I met Clif Hunter whose poem “Does Anyone Really Care to Know?” captured a standing ovation at the Irish pub at Branson Landing. It also captured the spirits on the Floyd Tillman tour bus near Galveston where “they” gave me the nickname “Clearwater” hence the title to this album and email address. The DVD movie production by Paranormal Investigations of Texas (paratexas.com) titled “Haunted Tillman Bus” and the original Jackie Moore and The Roadrunners CD are available on request. Thank you again for listening…see y’all while ago.




The Red Planet Orchestra – Changing the Status Quo of Film Scores



Conceived and conducted by Vincent Rees, the Red Planet Orchestra combine classical composition with a contemporary structure of electronic ambient music.

With sound artist Pete Smith, the Red Planet Orchestra has accumulated a growing body of work both rich in invention and subtlety. A sound palette of future memories and past dreams. Each release has created a landscape of intense serenity.

Their debut album, Aurora Symphony, was warmly received and now a firm favourite among fans – All albums feature original artwork conceived by Belgium artist Nicolas Crombez.

The Red Planet Orchestra continue to compose music for emerging film soundtracks such as the brilliant ‘Gorka’

Albums
Aurora Symphony – 2013
Secrets of Eternity – 2013
We Breathe Together-2014
States of Space -2014
The Angry Silence -2014
Time of Dark Consequences – 2016
Contamination – 2016

Red Planet Orchestra
Contact Red Planet Orchestra at bandcamp.com



 

FFM’s Indonesian Ambassador, Dita Nurdian has released a new track – Soba Ni Itai Yo


Dita Nurdian
Dita Nurdian

Soba Ni Itai Yo (feat. Maniac Mac) – Single

Dita Nurdian
Click to hear on itunes
Also’ you can listen my music on Tidal, iHeartRadio, Google play Music and many more
And this is my social media link :

FFM Ambassador for Indonesia – Dita Nurdian



Oscars 2018: ‘Remember Me’ From ‘Coco’ Wins Best Original Song



Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez’s “Remember Me” from the animated film Coco has just won the Best Original Song Academy Award.

This latest triumph is Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez’s second Academy Award together. The married couple won their first (and until now, only) Oscar for writing the international hit “Let It Go” from Frozen. That song (and the incredibly popular soundtrack it was featured on) also won them a pair of Grammys the following year. Robert Lopez is an EGOT winner, as he has also taken home an Emmy and a Tony Award, making him one of the few talents in history to do so.

“Remember Me” was sung by many different actors throughout the film, but the version that was released as a single was fronted by R&B superstar Miguel and Natalia Lafourcade. The track didn’t become anywhere near as ubiquitous a hit as “Let It Go,” though it was well-received and still did well enough in a few territories.

Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez’s “Remember Me” beat out the following four other worthy songs: Pasek & Paul’s “This Is Me” from The Greatest Showman, Sufjan Stevens’ “Mystery of Love” from Coco, Diane Warren and Common’s “Stand Up for Something” from Marshall and Mary J. Blige, Raphael Saadiq and Taura Stinson’s “Mighty River” from the film Mudbound.


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The 10 best music videos of 2017, from Kendrick Lamar to Haim





The year provided a range of visually daring, often audacious videos that were also able to provide powerful social commentary. Here’s our pick of the 10 best



What makes scary music scary? The science behind the spookiest soundtracks


Go to the profile of Eva Amsen

A scary movie would be far less scary without its soundtrack. Close your ears during the most tense scenes, and they become almost boring. Take this recut of the trailer for The Shining as a happy family movie (“Shining”). It’s funny partly because of the voice-over, but mainly because of the happy Peter Gabriel music at the end. It works the other way around as well, as demonstrated by a fan-made trailer of Frozen as a horror film.

Music makes scary movies scary — but what makes scary music scary?

Nonlinear noise

Daniel Blumstein is professor in the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UCLA. While studying marmots a few years ago, he noticed their distress calls were characterized by nonlinear noise patterns. He found this same pattern in other animals’ alarm calls, but also somewhere else: in the soundtracks of scary movies.

After analysing music from different movie genres, Blumstein discovered that scary movies often included high-pitched screams with a lot of noise. In this context, “noise” doesn’t mean “loud sounds”, but describes a disturbance in the sound — like radio noise. According to Blumstein, these noisy screams in scary movies have the same effect on us as animal distress calls: They evoke strong feelings, and we’re conditioned to find them disturbing.

In this TEDx talk, Blumstein explains how he collaborated with musicians to study the effect of nonlinear sound in film scores, and what this has to do with marmot screams.

The Devil’s interval

Not all scary music is characterised by high pitched shrieking. Sometimes the use of minor chords and dissonant sounds is enough to evoke a spooky atmosphere. In the Middle Ages, one interval even started to be referred to as “Devil’s interval”. It refers to the tritone, or augmented 4th. This is the interval between A and E flat, for example, or between D flat and G.

The name Devil’s interval has taken on a life of its own. From the 18th century, people started talking about the interval that was forbidden in medieval times. The name makes it sound mysterious and occult, but it’s likely that it was only called “Devil’s interval” to warn people against using this odd chord that didn’t follow conventional rules of music writing.

The Devil’s interval definitely sounds unpleasant, and does a good job of making scary music sound scary. You can find it in the opening violin chords of Saint Saens’ Danse Macabre.

What makes it so uncomfortable to listen to? It can all be explained with physics. In any two-note chord, each of the individual notes produces a sound wave with a distinct wavelength. This sounds nice when those two sound waves meet again after a one or more of each of their wavelengths. This combination of two waves then creates a new regular pattern. But the two notes that make up the tritone or Devil’s interval have incompatible wavelengths. They don’t meet. Instead of creating a new regular pattern, they form a dissonant sound. This is explained in more detail in the article Where math meets music on the Music Masterworks website.

The irregular wave pattern formed by the augmented fourth chord. (CC-BY-SA by Adrien1018 on Wikimedia)

Scary because we say it is

So, both high-pitched nonlinear noise and dissonant intervals generate feelings of unease that make them perfect for scary music. But that still doesn’t cover all aspects of scary music. What about the low drone sound used in the background of many films to generate suspense? What about the use of nursery rhymes or singing children to juxtapose fear and innocence?

We made these sounds scary by putting them in scary films in the first place.

In many cases, we have learned to associate certain music as “scary” simply because it’s often used in a certain way in films. Watch that Shining edited trailer a few more times, and you’ll start to think of Solsbury Hill as horror music. And Beethoven’s 9th isn’t inherently scary or unpleasant at all, but many film buffs associate it immediately with A Clockwork Orange whenever they hear it.

And in a way, this association also explains why high-pitched screams and dissonant chords sound “scary” to us. There are scientific explanations for why they sound unpleasant — they remind us of distress sounds, or they don’t form regular mathematical patterns — but unpleasant isn’t the same as scary. We made these sounds scary by putting them in scary films in the first place.

When you watch a scary movie this Halloween, pay close attention to the soundtrack and listen for nonlinear high-pitched screams, Devil’s intervals, and all the other tropes of scary music. And if it gets too much? Just mute the sound: it won’t be as scary anymore without the soundtrack.

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Much love and happy music making,

Roger Moisan







A rock & roll odyssey in the sands of the Sahara…

Libya, 2011. Amidst the bloody revolution to overthrow the tyrant Moammar Gaddafi, a defiant music scene explodes from the dust of war. After 42 years of silence, Benghazi suddenly resounds with a melodic fury, with hip-hop, heavy metal, rock, blues, and even country music echoing around the city. Suddenly, the once-silent streets of the crumbling city reverberate with the hopes and aspirations of a long-neglected youth, and a counter-culture is born.

Stronger than Bullets introduces the musicians who rise, and follows them as t

Stronger Than Bullets Trailer from Matthew Millan on Vimeo.