What is Stratos? A Product Review


Stratos Brass Embouchure Training System

The Stratos Brass Embouchure Training System is an adjustable attachment for all brass instruments designed to improve your embouchure. The Stratos Embouchure System helps to reduce mouthpiece pressure by counteracting the natural urge to pull the instrument closer to your face. This will directly improve your range, power, tone, stamina and overall playing. The Stratos System is handcrafted in the UK from high-quality aviation grade polished aluminium and simply attaches to the leadpipe of any brass instrument.

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Power Without Pressure

The Stratos Brass Embouchure Training System is a high-quality practice aid which reduces mouthpiece pressure and ensures a good jaw position. Excessive mouthpiece pressure restricts the flow of blood to the lips which results in reduced stamina. This is because the muscles at the sides of the lips are hardly being used and these muscles determine lip tension. The Stratos System encourages a balanced “floating” jaw position by reducing mouthpiece pressure and ensures the correct muscles are used. By using the Stratos System to encourage the correct position, musicians will develop an even tone throughout the entire range of their instrument.

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Fully Adjustable

The Stratos Embouchure System is incredibly versatile and can fit onto the leadpipe of any brass instrument. The system is easily adjustable to ensure the sprung cushioned cup sits comfortably against the musician. The Stratos System is handcrafted in the UK from professional aviation grade aluminium which is then polished to match the aesthetic of your brass instrument.

Reviews

“I want one and I want it now” Jens Lindemann CM – International Trumpet Soloist

“STRATOS is particularly useful in my warm-up, to focus my mind on the basics of a good embouchure set-up. Really useful … a great bit of kit” David Pyatt – Principal Horn, London Philharmonic Orchestra

“As an educator and a trombone player, I was so amazed with the STRATOS as a beneficial aid for the chops (lips) that every brass player should have. I believe this to be an invaluable tool for busy educators like myself. I would recommend it to all brass students.” Lord Chris Jeans – International Trombone Soloist

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THE HOUSEHOLD DIVISION MUSICIANS ASSOCIATION BAND

Septem Juncta In Uno – Seven Joined As One

 

The band was formed in 1981 and is made up of former musicians from the seven regiments of Her Majesty’s Household Division Bands namely:- The Life Guards, Blues and Royals (now the Household Cavalry Band), Grenadiers, Coldstream, Scots, Irish and Welsh Guards Bands. The present Household Division Musicians Association Band follows a long tradition of music making by musicians from these famous regiments.

Most of the members are still playing in leading London Orchestras, London Theatres, or teaching in music colleges and schools throughout the country.

The Band performs at numerous public and private engagements, most notably The Chelsea Flower Show, Eastbourne Bandstand, and at The Royal Hospital Chelsea. The Band rehearses at The Royal Hospital Chelsea, with which it is proud to be associated.

The band rehearses once a month on a Sunday morning from 10.30am  – 12.30pm at The Band Room at The Royal Hospital Chelsea.

Royal Hospital, Chelsea

Contact form to hire or join us.

Director of Music: David Vaninetti-Smart FLCM

Image result for david vaninetti smart

David began his musical career at the age of 13 as a trombonist for Barnstaple Town Military Band and Bideford Town Brass Band. In 1987, he joined the Army and was posted to the Band of the Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment. During his two years at the Royal Military School of Music, David took a change of course, studying flute and classical piano under Graham Mayger and Veronica Clayton respectively. It was while he was at Kneller Hall that David discovered his passion for writing band arrangements.

After postings to Northern Ireland and Cyprus in the early nineties, David successfully passed an audition for the Life Guards Band of the Household Cavalry. During a series of summer concerts for the Household Cavalry band, David was persuaded by the Director of Music to take yet another musical change: he became the principal oboist of the Band, a position that he held until he left the army in 1998. During his military service he has performed all around the world, playing for all the members of the Royal Family, The Lord Mayor of London, as well as countless Ambassadors and diplomats.

More About The Household Division



Work of the week – Bernd Alois Zimmermann’s Trumpet Concerto “Nobody knows de trouble I see”



On 20th March we celebrated the 100th anniversary of Bernd Alois Zimmermann’s birth. For this reason, many concerts featuring his compositions will be performed worldwide, including one of his most famous works, the Konzert “Nobody knows de trouble I see” für Trompete in C und Orchester. This week, the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra under the direction of Fabien Gabel and with Håkan Hardenberger as soloist, will play it on 23 March, and on the following day it will be performed by Paul Hübner together with the WDR Sinfonieorchester, conducted by Brad Lubman in the Funkhaus in Cologne.

Originally, the NDR commissioned Zimmermann to compose a piano concerto. However, by referencing the existence of countless piano concertos, Zimmermann was able to convince the NDR to promote the trumpet, which was somewhat neglected as a solo instrument, thereby making repeat performances of the work more probable. He had already made drafts of a trumpet concerto years earlier and completed them after he was commissioned. It was premiered on 11 October 1955 in the Studio X in Hamburg with the Sinfonieorchester des Norddeutschen Rundfunks and the trumpeter Adolf Scherbaum under the direction of Ernest Bour. At the time of the world premiere, the work was titled “Darkey’s darkness”. After a few years, however, Zimmerman learned that the word “Darkey” was used to describe a person of color in a contemptuous way, so he changed the title of his work to “Nobody knows de trouble I see” in reference to the spiritual that is used in the composition as cantus firmus.

Bernd Alois Zimmermann – Trumpet concerto: Crossover to reconciliation

The spiritual is at the center of the concerto and its structure is similar to that of a chorale prelude. Apart from this modern kind of a cantus firmus, Zimmermann also uses jazz elements and a twelve-tone-row as the basis for the composition. This special row appears frequently in Zimmermann’s work: It is also used in his Concerto for oboe, his film music for “Methamorphose”, and in his ballet Alagoana. By fusing these three formal principles, Zimmermann hoped to demonstrate a kind of fraternal connection in the music in response to the political realities of his time. As a soldier in the NS-regime and during the composition of the piece, Zimmermann’s awareness of the struggle of people of color in the USA to achieve equality and overcome endemic racial discrimination was heightened. He honors this struggle in the spelling of the title: Instead of “the”, Zimmermann uses a spelling based on the sound of the word as it was passed on through oral tradition, “de”.

“By the way I have recently finished a trumpet concerto with the title “Darkey’s darkness”. The negro spiritual “Nobody knows de trouble I see” underlies the work and the musical characteristics of the spiritual inform and imbue the work with the struggles of the coloured people.” –Bernd Alois Zimmermann, 1954

After this week’s concerts, the concerto can even be heard again. On 6 April, it will be performed by the ORF Radio-Symphonieorchester with Håkan Hardenberger as soloist under the conduction of John Storgårds. In addition, as part of a Zimmermann concert series, the SWR Sinfonieorchester conducted by Ingo Metzmacher will perform the trumpet concerto on 28 April with Håkan Hardenberger again as soloist.

The most recent edition of the Schott Journal is dedicated to Bernd Alois Zimmermann. Therein you can find all events about the anniversary and an insight into his most important works.

 



The Mouthpiece Booster – A review by Roger Moisan



By Roger Moisan

To boost or not to boost; that is the question. The mouthpiece booster has been around now for about 25 years and was originally developed by Denis Wick in response to the Bach Heavytop Mouthpiece Range. “What does it actually do?” I hear many brass players ask. Well, to start with, it doesn’t boost anything. What it does do is add mass to the mouthpiece, thereby reducing vibration loss at the busy end of the instrument. This enhances the sonority and weight of sound creating a richer, darker timbre with more overtones. No, it doesn’t make playing easier but fortissimo dynamics hold together better.

I have used mine for many years now but am selective in which genres it is appropriate for. Always orchestral as conductors love the sound but not for jazz and big band playing.

There are now many versions of the booster available which fit different mouthpieces with alternative weights, but the most versatile and simplest is still the Denis Wick model. There are boosters to fit every brass instrument from cornet to tuba and they provide an extra option for the versatile brass player.

Check out the ‘With and without’ video and see if you can tell the difference.

You can study online or in residence with

Roger Moisan

rogermoisan@yahoo.co.uk


Sounds of Brass – Great Brass Band Music



Great Brass Band Music

Sounds of Brass is a dedicated online radio programme for Brass Bands.
Music, news, events included in our weekly, live 2 hour broadcast!
Every Wednesday 12-2pm UK time
To tune in simply go to www.crmk.co.uk
All our programmes are recorded Live and available to listen to again here at your leisure!
More details on our Facebook Page