Category Archives: Brass

The Arban Cornet Method – A Free, Legal Download


The Arban Method (La grande méthode complète de cornet à piston et de saxhorn par Arban) is a complete pedagogical method for students of trumpetcornet, and other brass instruments. The original edition was published by Jean-Baptiste Arban sometime before 1859 and is currently in print.[1] It contains hundreds of exercises, ranging in difficulty. The method begins with basic exercises and progresses to very advanced compositions, including the famous arrangement of Carnival of Venice.

Below you will find three of the main sections of the Arban which you can download for free totally legally.

Pages 1-56

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Pages 123-190

39087017795040pp123-190

Pages 283-347

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Much love and happy brass playing,

Roger Moisan.












Trumpet Legends – Timofei Dokshizer







Timofei Dokshizer was born on December 13th, 1921 in the town of Nezhin, Ukraine to the family of musicians. He received his initial education at the Glazunov Music College in Moscow under the tutelage of Ivan Vasilevsky. He continued his studies at the Central Music School in the class of professor Mikhail Tabakov. In 1950, Dokshizer graduated from the Gnessin’s Music Institute under the supervision of the same professor. Mr. Dokshizer received his Master Degree in conducting from the Moscow State Conservatory in 1957, studying with Leo Ginzburg.

At age 19, Timofei Dokshizer won the Soviet-Union brass instruments’ players competition and in 1947, Mr. Dokshizer won the International Competition in Prague, which jumpstarted his performance career. From that point on, his profound artistry and creativity set a standard of excellence for other trumpeters to follow.

He frequently toured the USSR and abroad, winning aclaim from critics who praised his timber, beautiful tone, unique phrasing, and filigree technique. In addition to his solo performances, Dokshizer worked at the Bolshoi Theatre of Opera and Ballet in Moscow. Here, he was revered for his brilliant renditions of some of the most difficult orchestral trumpet solos, particularly in Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake,” Prokofiev’s “War and Peace” and “Romeo and Juliet,” Khachaturian’s “Spartacus,” and many others.

His Repertoire was incredibly vast and included nearly everything ever written for the trumpet, along with works previously arranged for the instrument, from Bach, Haydn, Hummel, Albinoni and Vivaldi to his contemporaries, Shostakovich, Wainberg, Schedrin, Gershwin and others. Many works performed by Timofei Dokshizer were his own transcriptions, of which there were over 80 along the course of his lifetime. Among these were popular miniatures, originally written for violin, piano or voice by Kreisler, Sarasate, Debussy, Ravel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Rubinstein, Rachmaninoff, Chopin and he often included his own cadenzas for concerti by Haydn, Hummel and Arutiunian. Mr. Dokshizer was responsible for a tremendous expansion of trumpet repertoire, both through his own contribution to the art form and through compositions written especially for him throughout his life.


Nearly a quarter century of Mr. Dokshizer’s career was dedicated to pedagogical work. He was a professor at the Gnessin’s Music Institute and has brought up scores of talented trumpet players. He has left behind invaluable teaching materials. Mr. Dokshizer conducted and adjudicated countless teaching seminars, master classes, international competitions and festivals. He moved to Vilnius, Lithuania in 1990 where he lived until his passing on March 16, 2005.



Stop Struggling, There Is An Easier Way! – FREE Workshops for Brass Players


Music Gear for the New Term



New Term Music Offers from Gear4music are designed for both students and teachers looking for a great deal for the new academic term. We’ve selected a range of musical equipment for students, schools and colleges including great beginner guitar packs with everything a new player would need, a selection of percussion sets perfect for group work and keyboards and pianos with intuitive learning functions.

Click to see what’s on offer at Gear 4 Music

Music at schools, colleges and universities can be hugely inspirational for everyone involved with a wealth of research demonstrating the concentration and IQ benefits of music. Gear4music support music students and teachers by offering a wide range of great value musical instruments, equipment and accessories ideal for beginners.

Click to see what’s on offer at Gear 4 Music

Whatever you need, our variety of back to school music deals has been carefully chosen to offer something for everyone. From guitars and drums to violins and pianos our back to school music deals include a wide range of musical instruments plus easy to use recording equipment and accessories.

 



Yamaha YTR-8340 Eric Miyashiro Bb Trumpet

Eric Miyashiro has become a highly regarded musician for modern jazz. Having studied at Berklee, Miyashiro worked as a freelance studio musician, before becoming the frontman for a variety of touring bands, as well as a supporting musician for artists such as Frank Sinatra. In the 2000s Miyashiro released multiple albums, which each display his devotion to jazz. Having arranged various film and television scores, as well as countless musical pieces, Miyashiro displays versatile and emotive performances. The signature Yamaha model is ideal for fans of Eric Miyashiro, or musicians who want their own voicing to shine through.

Click image to find out where you can get one

New Features

The YTR-8340 model of trumpet has a range of new features to benefit the musician. The multi-bore system reduces back pressure with a large bore valve slide to bypass when the piston isn’t depressed. The French bead rim is an advanced shape that aligns with the curling for improved feedback. The side valve casting is non-conventional compared to it typically being on the underside. This results in a more open vibration. These custom features have been designed with Miyashiro to produce an overall tone and playability that suits his style of musicianship. The YTR-8340 proves itself as a forward thinking instrument.

Everything You Need

The Yamaha YTR-8340 trumpet comes with a dedicated carry case and mouthpiece. The instrument is stored securely inside the case and avoids knocks and scratches keeping it looking, feeling and performing like new for longer. The case’s felt interior retains the polish quality even when on the move. The EM1 mouthpiece has a comfortable feel and smooth playability, so you are assured to get the best out of your trumpet.

Click image to get yours

Specifications

  • Key: Bb
  • Body Material: Yellow Brass
  • Weighting: Light
  • Bell Diameter: 134.4mm
  • Bell Material: Yellow Brass
  • Bell Construction: One Piece
  • Bore: Multi-Bore
  • Finish: Silver Plated
  • Included Accessories: EM1 Mouthpiece, TRC-8340EM Case



The Valve-less Scale Exercise For Trumpet

The valve-less scale exercise.  

This is an advanced exercise for trumpet players to help develop embouchure strength, pitch surety and control.

  1. Play a strong low F to establish pitch.
  2. Remove the tuning slide and play the same note. Hold the instrument lightly and finger as if playing normally.
  3. Slowly, play up the F major scale trying to pitch and centre each note. This will be very difficult to start with especially the first 3 notes after the F. The G, A and Bb are outside the natural harmonics on the leadpipe.
  4. As the notes begin to sound more easily, play the F major scale up and down slowly. (Always finger the notes as if playing normally)
  5. Finally, replace the tuning slide and play the F major scale again slowly without the valves.

This exercise can be extended into other keys and also into playing melodies. I like to play ‘Somewhere over the Rainbow’ after the scale exercise.

Caution! This exercise is extremely tiring and should only be performed after a good warm up and rest for 5 minutes before continuing practising.

Never play this exercise in the ear shot of a fixer! They won’t understand and will think you can’t play.

Study online with Roger Moisan

LARRY MEREGILLANO SAYS “THINK BEFORE YOU STINK”




This article is from the brilliant ‘Secrets of the Musical Mind’  where you can hear the full pod cast and many more great interviews with musicians around the world. Freedom for Musicians would like to thank the team for sharing this article.

By James Newcomb

Larry Meregillano is a Bach artist/clinician. He started his professional career playing in big bands in San Diego

in the early 1970’s. In 1976, he was hired to play in Tom Ranier’s Show band at Disneyland.

A year later, Mr. Meregillano joined the gospel group Truth and soon after went on to perform and tour with The Bill Gaither Trio. While traveling and recording with The Bill Gaither Trio, he also recorded with Sandi Patti, David T, Clydsdale, Ron Huff, Don Marsh and many others.

In 1980, Larry returned to California and became the lead trumpet player
for the world-famous Disneyland Band. In the late 1980’s, Larry was hired to play in the PTL Television Orchestra with Jim and Tammy Faye Baker. From there he joined Princess Cruise lines as Musical Director.

After many years, Mr. Meregillano moved to Orlando, Florida, where he performed with many bands at Walt Disney World, MGM Studios, Epcot Center, Universal Studios and Pleasure Island. He has also been the Musical Director and performer for many cruise lines including the world-famous Queen Elizabeth 2.

Larry has toured with the Temptations and The Four Tops, and has been a sideman for Rosemary Clooney, Joe Williams, Jack Jones, Bob Hope, Celia Cruz, Frankie Avalon and many, many others. Mr. Meregillano has recorded with many artists including Hubert Laws, Latoya Jackson, and Rick Dees.

Mr. Meregillano can often be seen playing with The Tom Kubis GWC Big Band and is a busy freelance musician playing recording dates, theater and stage shows in the Los Angeles area and around the country.

_______________________________________________




JN: This podcast is about the psychology of peak musical performance. And in order to talk about performing at our best, sometimes we need to talk about times when we weren’t at our best. So can you tell us a story of a time when you expected to play well but it didn’t work out as you thought it would? And then how you dealt with it.

LM: When I was 19 years old, I was a featured soloist in my father’s church. I had decided to change my mouthpiece just a couple of days before. So there’s always a learning curve when playing a new mouthpiece, and when I got up to play the solo, I couldn’t make it halfway through. There were a few hundred people there. My lips just collapsed.

So how did I deal with it? For all the hours and hours of practice I had put in to that point, I felt as though my trumpet had let me down, that I had let myself down. So I slammed my trumpet down in the case, marched out of the church and walked the 5 miles home. I was so upset (laughing). Today, I deal with things like that a little differently. But that was progbably the worst moment of my young career. I was so humiliated and so let down.

The problem with the trumpet is no matter how good a musician we are, if the physical elelments are not happening, we simply can’t get the music out of our bodies. No matter how much we study, how much we know the style, intonation, how music should flow. If we don’t have the chops to produce the tone, we are nothing. That’s why trumpet players are notorious for calling themselves slaves to the instrument. WE always have to practice every day, certain rudimental aspects of playing. Otherwise we could very easily make a fool of ourselves, no matter how high up the ladder we might be.

JN: What was the difference between your old and new mouthpiece in that story?

LM: I think I was playing a Bill Chase Jet Tone. Remember this was the 1970’s. Bill Chase was all the rage and I wanted to sound just like him. So ultimately, I just didn’t have enough time to make the adjustment physically in that particular case.

JN: Not everyone listening to this is a trumpet player, so not everyone knows that the slightest chance in any part of the mouthpiece can make a tremendous difference in how it feels to the player. It usually takes a little while for your body to get used to a new mouthpiece. So looking back at that experience, aside from the obvious of playing a new mouthpiece before you were used to it, what could you have done differently in that situation?

LM: The way I handle it today when I’m not 100%. The fact of the matter is the audience had no idea I was struggling. I should have been more gracious, put my horn down, smiled and got on with my day. That’s the way to handle it. As long as you’re doing your very best at any given time, you’ve done your best to prepare, you’ve done everything you can do to make a good performance, there’s no reason to feel bad about missing a few notes. I probably remember it worse than it really was.

So how I handled it then as a new pro player was a lot differently than today. Today I would just laugh it off. But then I internalized it. I got mad, I stomped 5 miles home.




JN: Perhaps there was some slight ego issues you had to work through.

LM: I don’t know if it was ego or if I was just so disappointed in myself. I had tried so hard, practiced several hours a day. But today, you realize that your worst is still at a level that’s acceptable. You just relax and roll with it. Collect your check and go. You split a note, you might miss an entrance. The best advice in such a situation is when you’re not feeling well and not up to par, hide what you can’t do. Let them think you can do it. You don’t have to show them if it’s not written.

Sometimes we’re just too hard on ourselves and we want to sound like Maynard Ferguson when all we’ve got is Herb Alpert. No disrespect to Herb Alpert, but I want to sound like Maynard!

JN: What’s the highest profile gig you’ve ever done?

LM: It’s hard to pick one out, but since this podcast is on the topic of performance anxiety and such, let’s go back to 1980. At the time, I was working at Disneyland and I was chosen to be the lead trumpet player of the Disney show that performed there for their 25th Anniversary. We took the show to New York City with part of the United Nations delegates. I got so nervous. Here I am sitting with the top guys on Broadway, all these high profile figures at a black tie event in at Lincoln Center. I’m 23 years old.

My mouth was getting dry, so I drank a bunch of iced tea before the show. Fortunately for me, the show didn’t last that long. I nailed it, but I don’t think I’ve ever had to go to the bathroom worse than I did during that gig. It was rather painful (laughing)

After the show, one of the top Broadway players came up to me back stage and said, “Larry, come move to New York. I’ll put you to work right away.” I’m just a kid, 23 years old. Scared to death of the Big Apple. I often wonder how my career would have ended up had I taken him up on his offer. But I was working quite often at Disney and I really didn’t need another job.

Another high profile gig was for the opening of Pocahantas, again in New York City. They had several acts on, and I was up there with a rock and roll band from Disney World. And there were 450,000 people there at this live concert. I’m having fun, no dry mouth, no issues at all. I just had a great time. I play a jazz solo, and I’m having fun until I look over my left hand shoulder and who’s watching me play but Wayne Bergeron? He’s just staring at me.

Wayne was lead trumpeter with the Disneyland band, this is early in his career, so that didn’t bother me too much. But then I looked over my right shoulder, and there stood Arturo Sandoval. He’s staring at me too. I suddenly started shaking in my boots.

So the huge crowd didn’t bother me, but those two people did. Interesting how that goes.

JN: What do you think the difference between this time when you’re playing in front of 450,000 people with no problems, and playing at your dad’s church where you fell apart in front of 300 people?

LM: I was 19 years old when I fell apart. By the time the first gig I mentioned came, I was 23. I had grown a lot, had a lot more experience. And at the second gig, I was in my 40’s. So as you grow as a pro musician, you just learn to adapt this mindset that you’re as comfortable as you are in your own living room. Doesn’t matter who you’re playing for.

In the 80’s, I was one of the trumpet players in the TV series, “PTL Show” with Jim and Tammy Baker. Every day, I’d have to remind myself that at the end of my microphone were as many as 68 million people listening on a live cast. There’s no taking back a clam. So it’s okay to have a little bit of edge, a little bit of stage fright. It’s motivation to heklp you concentrate on what you’re doing. So we’d get comfortable, laughing with each other and all of a sudden the producer is saying, “5,4,3,…” And you’d better play that note correctly.




JN: It’s just a matter of making those nerves work for you rather than against you.

LM: Absolutely. A little bit of nerves is good for you. You’re on edge, you’re concentrating, ready to go. The worst thing you can do is be in a situation like that and be lethargic. That does happen to us as professionals. Day after day, it can get lackadaisical, you’re not concentrating.

JN: ­­­Larry, you are now on the Hot Seat. Do you think you can stand the heat? 

LM: I think so.

JN: It’s 5 minutes before you go on stage for an important performance… What are you doing?

LM: It depends on what I’m doing, whether it’s a Broadway show or an entertainer I don’t know. I’m looking at the book. What will I play, what are the key changes, how should I pace myself? I’ll do an instrument inventory, mutes, oils, right mouthpiece, etc. Most important is the mental preparation. You can rehearse the show in just a few minutes by flipping through the book. Make sure it’s in order. Every aspect of musical performance I’ll review prior to playing.

JN: What’s the best performance-related advice you’ve ever received?

LM: Think before you stink.

JN: Can you share one tip for our listeners to help deal with stage fright? (Physical, mental, etc.)

LM: I struggled with this for a long time. What I’ve learned is just relax. Luck is when opportunity meets preparedness. When you’re prepared, you have confidence you’re not going to clam up, that your chops are up to par, that you’ll play what you need to play. If I haven’t practiced before a performance, I’ll be nervous because I’m not 100% sure how it’s going to go. But when my guns are loaded and ready to go, I have confidence to know it’s okay. I can do this.

JN: Imagine you’re on stage. It’s the end of the performance and the audience is on its feet, applauding. They don’t want any more and they don’t want any less. Everything is perfect. What have you just done? Give details: Venue, repertoire, band mates, etc. Get Creative!!!

LM: One of the most poignant memories I have in my career was a Latin weekend at Disneyland and Celia Cruz was there. I was doing a trumpet battle with a friend of mine at this show. We went back and forth, Celia is calling for us to keep going. We kept answering each other and we ended up on a double high D together. And spontaneously, the entire crowd stood up on their feet, yelled and cheered. That was one of the greatest feelings I’ve ever had. That was a special moment, and I’ve had many that are similar to that.

JN: Larry Meregillano can be found on the web at trumpetlegacy.com. Larry, thank you for being on the podcast, and for bringing us one step closer to understanding the Secrets of the Musical Mind!

LM: Thank you for having me. It’s been a real honor!





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The History of the Trumpet: Wynton Marsalis

Wynton Marsalis

The History of The Trumpet (DVD trailer)

Biography

Wynton Marsalis is an internationally acclaimed musician, composer, bandleader, educator and a leading advocate of American culture. He is the world’s first jazz artist to perform and compose across the full jazz spectrum from its New Orleans roots to bebop to modern jazz.

By creating and performing an expansive range of brilliant new music for quartets to big bands, chamber music ensembles to symphony orchestras, tap dance to ballet, Wynton has expanded the vocabulary for jazz and created a vital body of work that places him among the world’s finest musicians and composers.

The Early Years

Wynton was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, on October 18, 1961, to Ellis and Dolores Marsalis, the second of six sons. At an early age he exhibited a superior aptitude for music and a desire to participate in American culture. At age eight Wynton performed traditional New Orleans music in the Fairview Baptist Church band led by legendary banjoist Danny Barker, and at 14 he performed with the New Orleans Philharmonic. During high school Wynton performed with the New Orleans Symphony Brass Quintet, New Orleans Community Concert Band, New Orleans Youth Orchestra, New Orleans Symphony, various jazz bands and with the popular local funk band, the Creators.

At age 17 Wynton became the youngest musician ever to be admitted to Tanglewood’s Berkshire Music Center. Despite his youth, he was awarded the school’s prestigious Harvey Shapiro Award for outstanding brass student. Wynton moved to New York City to attend Juilliard in 1979. When he began to pick up gigs around town, the grapevine began to buzz. In 1980 Wynton seized the opportunity to join the Jazz Messengers to study under master drummer and bandleader Art Blakey. It was from Blakey that Wynton acquired his concept for bandleading and for bringing intensity to each and every performance. In the years to follow Wynton performed with Sarah Vaughan, Dizzy Gillespie, Sweets Edison, Clark Terry, John Lewis, Sonny Rollins, Ron Carter, Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams and countless other jazz legends.

Wynton assembled his own band in 1981 and hit the road, performing over 120 concerts every year for 15 consecutive years. With the power of his superior musicianship, the infectious sound of his swinging bands and an exhaustive series of performances and music workshops, Marsalis rekindled widespread interest in jazz throughout the world. Wynton embraced the jazz lineage to garner recognition for the older generation of overlooked jazz musicians and prompted the re-issue of jazz catalog by record companies worldwide. He also inspired a renaissance that attracted a new generation of fine young talent to jazz.
A look at the more distinguished jazz musicians of today reveals numerous students of Marsalis’ workshops: James Carter, Christian McBride, Roy Hargrove, Harry Connick Jr., Nicholas Payton, Eric Reed and Eric Lewis, to name a few.

Wynton Marsalis
The maestro

 

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Eric Miyashiro in London




Phil Parker Ltd are pleased to welcome Eric Miyashiro  to 85 Hampstead Road !

Eric Miyashiro is an Internationally acclaimed trumpet player. His playing is characterized by a term used on his web site,”StratosphERIC”. Miyashiro is well known as a powerhouse Big Band lead player but he is also a first call classical symphonic musician. Eric is comfortable playing all idioms. He is a Yamaha Performing Artist and clinician.
He will be interviewed for live broadcast by Jazz fm and follow up with a clinic in our seminar room. Playing and listening places are limited so book now  to avoid disappointment.

Eric Miyashiro

[ Image ] Eric Miyashiro

Born and raised in Hawaii to a musical family, Eric is now one of the most in demand soloist/clinician in the world. He spent his early days in Honolulu studying both classical and Pop/Jazz music, later moving to Berklee Collage of Music to continue his education. Since leaving school, he has toured worldwide with: Buddy Rich, Woody Herman, Stevie Wonder, Tower of Power, and performed with many other artists and orchestras around the globe. Eric now resides in Japan, where he is the first call studio/session/solo player, and is also very active as a leader of his own bands; EM band and the Blue Note All Star Jazz Orchestra. Eric’s versatility has been showcased in many television shows, radio, and film scores. He is also known as an accomplished composer, arranger, and producer.
Eric is a visiting trumpet/popular music professor at Kunitachi College of Music, Showa Music Academy, Senzoku Gakuen College of Music, and Osaka University of Arts.
Eric Miyashiro is an International Yamaha Performing Artist.