FFM’s USA Ambassador Aria Elan’s message to the world “Free Mama Earth”


I sang "Free Mama Earth" at a screening of the sequel to Al Gore's documentary "An Inconvenient Truth." Please share so that more people can join the moral struggle to save our environment and ourselves. We shall overcome! One Love...

Free Mama Earth!

I sang "Free Mama Earth" at a screening of the sequel to Al Gore's documentary "An Inconvenient Truth." Please share so that more people can join the moral struggle to save our environment and ourselves. We shall overcome! One Love...

Posted by Aria Elan on Saturday, 11 November 2017

Freedom For Musicians are passionate about the environment and spreading the message about climate change. If our generation continue to ignore the obvious and devastating effects that we are living with NOW, our children and children's children will bare the consequences of our ignorant inaction. Please share Aria Elan's message and do something to help change things for all our futures.

Roger Moisan CEO FFM Records. 


What makes scary music scary? The science behind the spookiest soundtracks


Go to the profile of Eva Amsen

A scary movie would be far less scary without its soundtrack. Close your ears during the most tense scenes, and they become almost boring. Take this recut of the trailer for The Shining as a happy family movie (“Shining”). It’s funny partly because of the voice-over, but mainly because of the happy Peter Gabriel music at the end. It works the other way around as well, as demonstrated by a fan-made trailer of Frozen as a horror film.

Music makes scary movies scary — but what makes scary music scary?

Nonlinear noise

Daniel Blumstein is professor in the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UCLA. While studying marmots a few years ago, he noticed their distress calls were characterized by nonlinear noise patterns. He found this same pattern in other animals’ alarm calls, but also somewhere else: in the soundtracks of scary movies.

After analysing music from different movie genres, Blumstein discovered that scary movies often included high-pitched screams with a lot of noise. In this context, “noise” doesn’t mean “loud sounds”, but describes a disturbance in the sound — like radio noise. According to Blumstein, these noisy screams in scary movies have the same effect on us as animal distress calls: They evoke strong feelings, and we’re conditioned to find them disturbing.

In this TEDx talk, Blumstein explains how he collaborated with musicians to study the effect of nonlinear sound in film scores, and what this has to do with marmot screams.

The Devil’s interval

Not all scary music is characterised by high pitched shrieking. Sometimes the use of minor chords and dissonant sounds is enough to evoke a spooky atmosphere. In the Middle Ages, one interval even started to be referred to as “Devil’s interval”. It refers to the tritone, or augmented 4th. This is the interval between A and E flat, for example, or between D flat and G.

The name Devil’s interval has taken on a life of its own. From the 18th century, people started talking about the interval that was forbidden in medieval times. The name makes it sound mysterious and occult, but it’s likely that it was only called “Devil’s interval” to warn people against using this odd chord that didn’t follow conventional rules of music writing.

The Devil’s interval definitely sounds unpleasant, and does a good job of making scary music sound scary. You can find it in the opening violin chords of Saint Saens’ Danse Macabre.

What makes it so uncomfortable to listen to? It can all be explained with physics. In any two-note chord, each of the individual notes produces a sound wave with a distinct wavelength. This sounds nice when those two sound waves meet again after a one or more of each of their wavelengths. This combination of two waves then creates a new regular pattern. But the two notes that make up the tritone or Devil’s interval have incompatible wavelengths. They don’t meet. Instead of creating a new regular pattern, they form a dissonant sound. This is explained in more detail in the article Where math meets music on the Music Masterworks website.

The irregular wave pattern formed by the augmented fourth chord. (CC-BY-SA by Adrien1018 on Wikimedia)

Scary because we say it is

So, both high-pitched nonlinear noise and dissonant intervals generate feelings of unease that make them perfect for scary music. But that still doesn’t cover all aspects of scary music. What about the low drone sound used in the background of many films to generate suspense? What about the use of nursery rhymes or singing children to juxtapose fear and innocence?

We made these sounds scary by putting them in scary films in the first place.

In many cases, we have learned to associate certain music as “scary” simply because it’s often used in a certain way in films. Watch that Shining edited trailer a few more times, and you’ll start to think of Solsbury Hill as horror music. And Beethoven’s 9th isn’t inherently scary or unpleasant at all, but many film buffs associate it immediately with A Clockwork Orange whenever they hear it.

And in a way, this association also explains why high-pitched screams and dissonant chords sound “scary” to us. There are scientific explanations for why they sound unpleasant — they remind us of distress sounds, or they don’t form regular mathematical patterns — but unpleasant isn’t the same as scary. We made these sounds scary by putting them in scary films in the first place.

When you watch a scary movie this Halloween, pay close attention to the soundtrack and listen for nonlinear high-pitched screams, Devil’s intervals, and all the other tropes of scary music. And if it gets too much? Just mute the sound: it won’t be as scary anymore without the soundtrack.

Read more:

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Much love and happy music making,

Roger Moisan







WOW!! £33,000 Of Free Music Gear!!


Enter Gear4music’s biggest ever giveaway now to win over £33,000 worth of music gear!

To kick off the festive season in style, we’ve partnered with some of the music industry’s biggest brands to offer you the chance to win the ultimate rig. We’re giving away an incredible £33,000 of gear including everything you need to play, perform and produce. From guitars to synths, from live sound to studio recording, you could win it all.

One person…yes, you read that right…ONE VERY LUCKY PERSON WILL WIN THE ENTIRE RIG! This huge prize includes products from: Ableton, ADJ, Arturia, Avantone, Besson, Casio, Conn Selmer, Dreadbox, Evans, Fender, Focal, Gravity, Hardcase, LD Systems, Ludwig, Marshall, Musicman, Natal, Native Instruments, Nord, Orange, Pioneer DJ, Propellerhead, QSC, Radial, Schlagwerk, Sennheiser, Shaw, Tama, Universal Audio, Vox, Yamaha and Zildjian. Scroll down for a complete list of everything included in this incredible giveaway.

Click to enter this amazing offer

If this has been helpful to you, please help us by clicking on our sponsor’s ads. It won’t cost you anything but we will get a few pence per click.

Much love and happy music making,

Roger Moisan







Introducing Featured Artist – Blow_Flyy



Blow_Flyy who Performs out of Toronto Canada, but from Halifax/Dartmouth Nova Scotia, is a new age artist with a new thought process, he does it his way, for the Fans, that is with out rhyming, instead telling stories.

When it comes to the industry. He, like most artists who are true to the game and themselves, wants to pursue his career solely as an independent artist. While many artists are looking to be signed, he remains loyal to his identity and genre.

Blow_Fly

As an artist who has clean content, he has potential to gain a lot of respect within the wide spectrum of the industry. Respect with parental units and less vulgar entities will bring new money in a present yet undisturbed revenue stream.

Blow_Flyy is destined to make a dent in the industry starting in Canada, to the U.S., and then world-wide, definitely keep your eyes on this artist….

Get to know Blo_Flyy at his FB Page

Check out Blow_Flyy on Audiomack

Managed by Gary Johnson Jr email gj40@hotmail.ca

Featured Artist – Blow_Flyy

If this has been helpful to you, please help us by clicking on our sponsor’s ads. It won’t cost you anything but we will get a few pence per click.

Much love and happy music making,

Roger Moisan







Musical Legends – Oscar Peterson



Oscar Peterson was one of the greatest piano players of all time. A pianist with phenomenal technique on the level of his idol, Art TatumPeterson‘s speed, dexterity, and ability to swing at any tempo were amazing. Very effective in small groups, jam sessions, and in accompanying singers, O.P. was at his absolute best when performing unaccompanied solos. His original style did not fall into any specific idiom. Like Erroll Garner and George ShearingPeterson‘s distinctive playing formed during the mid- to late ’40s and fell somewhere between swing and bop. Peterson was criticized through the years because he used so many notes, didn’t evolve much since the 1950s, and recorded a remarkable number of albums. Perhaps it is because critics ran out of favorable adjectives to use early in his career; certainly it can be said that Peterson played 100 notes when other pianists might have used ten, but all 100 usually fit, and there is nothing wrong with showing off technique when it serves the music. As with Johnny Hodges and Thelonious Monk, to name two, Peterson spent his career growing within his style rather than making any major changes once his approach was set, certainly an acceptable way to handle one’s career. Because he was Norman Granz‘s favorite pianist (along with Tatum) and the producer tended to record some of his artists excessively, Peterson made an incredible number of albums. Not all are essential, and a few are routine, but the great majority are quite excellent, and there are dozens of classics.

Peterson started classical piano lessons when he was six and developed quickly. After winning a talent show at 14, he began starring on a weekly radio show in Montreal. Peterson picked up early experience as a teenager playing with Johnny Holmes’ Orchestra. From 1945-1949, he recorded 32 selections for Victor in Montreal. Those trio performances find Peterson displaying a love for boogie-woogie, which he would soon discard, and the swing style of Teddy Wilson and Nat King Cole. His technique was quite brilliant even at that early stage, and although he had not yet been touched by the influence of bop, he was already a very impressive player. Granz discovered Peterson in 1949 and soon presented him as a surprise guest at a Jazz at the Philharmonic concert.

Peterson was recorded in 1950 on a series of duets with either Ray Brown or Major Holley on bass; his version of “Tenderly” became a hit. Peterson‘s talents were quite obvious, and he became a household name in 1952 when he formed a trio with guitarist Barney Kessel and BrownKessel tired of the road and was replaced by Herb Ellis the following year. The PetersonEllisBrown trio, which often toured with JATP, was one of jazz’s great combos from 1953-1958. Their complex yet swinging arrangements were competitive — Ellis and Brownwere always trying to outwit and push the pianist — and consistently exciting. In 1958, when Ellis left the band, it was decided that no other guitarist could fill in so well, and he was replaced (after a brief stint by Gene Gammage) by drummer Ed Thigpen. In contrast to the earlier group, the PetersonBrownThigpen trio (which lasted until 1965) found the pianist easily the dominant soloist. Later versions of the group featured drummers Louis Hayes (1965-1966), Bobby Durham (1967-1970), Ray Price (1970), and bassists Sam Jones (1966-1970) and George Mraz (1970).

With Respect to Nat

In 1960, Peterson established the Advanced School of Contemporary Music in Toronto, which lasted for three years. He made his first recorded set of unaccompanied piano solos in 1968 (strange that Granz had not thought of it) during his highly rated series of MPS recordings. With the formation of the Pablo label by Granz in 1972, Peterson was often teamed with guitarist Joe Pass and bassist Niels Pedersen. He appeared on dozens of all-star records, made five duet albums with top trumpeters (Dizzy GillespieRoy EldridgeHarry “Sweets” EdisonClark Terry, and Jon Faddis), and teamed up with Count Basie on several two-piano dates. An underrated composer, Peterson wrote and recorded the impressive “Canadiana Suite” in 1964 and has occasionally performed originals in the years since. Although always thought of as a masterful acoustic pianist, Peterson has also recorded on electric piano (particularly some of his own works), organ on rare occasions, and even clavichord for an odd duet date with Joe Pass. One of his rare vocal sessions in 1965, With Respect to Nat, reveals that Peterson‘s singing voice was nearly identical to Nat King Cole‘s. A two-day reunion with Herb Ellis and Ray Brown in 1990 (which also included Bobby Durham) resulted in four CDs. Peterson was felled by a serious stroke in 1993 that knocked him out of action for two years. He gradually returned to the scene, however, although with a weakened left hand. Even when he wasn’t 100 percent, Peterson was a classic improviser, one of the finest musicians that jazz has ever produced. The pianist appeared on an enormous number of records through the years. As a leader, he has recorded for Victor, Granz‘s Clef and Verve labels (1950-1964), MPS, Mercury, Limelight, Pablo, and Telarc.

Pianist Oscar Peterson was the biggest name to emerge from the golden age of jazz in Montreal.

If this has been helpful to you, please help us by clicking on our sponsor’s ads. It won’t cost you anything but we will get a few pence per click.

Much love and happy music making,

Roger Moisan







Today’s FFM Stage belongs to Lynda Law – I Look to You


Check out Lynda Law’s dreamy track ‘I Look to You’.  Spread the love by visiting Lynda’s FB page and sharing.

This is a non-profit project solely meant to promote Miss Lynda Law as a singer and as a tribute to great music. My warm thanks goes out to the great Walter SISMONDO on saxophone

Singer- Lynda Law. Radio Presenter Chart Singles and USA Jazz album with Gino Vannelli. No:1-Malta
Singer- Lynda Law. Radio Presenter Chart Singles and USA Jazz album with Gino Vannelli. No:1-Malta

If this has been helpful to you, please help us by clicking on our sponsor’s ads. It won’t cost you anything but we will get a few pence per click.

Much love and happy music making,

Roger Moisan







WIN A FANTASTIC COWON PD HI RES PLAYER





Each month we have a range of competitions with great prizes from our range!

This month we offer you the chance to win one of the fantastic Cowon PD Hi Res DAPs. The PD has been one of our best sellers this year and for a very good reason, the player is a great package and a great buy at just £199. Watch out for our Black Friday deals as well which will include a couple of PD deals!

Cowon Plenue D (PD) High Resolution 32GB Music Player with microSD Expansion Slot
Cowon Plenue D (PD) High Resolution 32GB Music Player with microSD Expansion Slot

End Date: 30/11/2017

ENTER NOW






Today’s FFM Stage Belongs to Claudio Fava


Singer songwriter Claudio Fava hails from Milan, Italy with his latest track ‘Hello Hello’. Spread the love by subscribing to Claudio’s Youtube channel and downloading the track at Google Play.

Cantautore milanese, impegnato in una corsa contro il tempo, alla ricerca di suoni parole e melodie senza tempo. “SIAMO TUTTO SIAMO NIENTE”

Claudio Fava on Facebook.

If this has been helpful to you, please help us by clicking on our sponsor’s ads. It won’t cost you anything but we will get a few pence per click.

Much love and happy music making,

Roger Moisan

 







Today’s FFM Stage Belongs to Platinum Brass4


Enjoy the wonderful sonorous sound of lower brass with the Platinum Brass4 Ensemble. Spread the love by subscribing to their Youtube channel and sharing.

DREAMS (Composer. Friedrich Ventura) Platinumbrass4 Enzo de Rosa Lead Trombone, Giancarlo Cesaroni Tenor Trombone, Friedrich Ventura Bass Trombone, Davide Borgonovi Tuba, Daniele Quaglieri Drums.

https://www.facebook.com/Platinumbrass4/ https://twitter.com/platinumbrass4

If this has been helpful to you, please help us by clicking on our sponsor’s ads. It won’t cost you anything but we will get a few pence per click.

Much love and happy music making,

Roger Moisan







Careers in the Royal Air Force Music Services


Current Vacancies: Oboe, Clarinet, Saxophone, French Horn, Tenor Trombone, Tuba, Bass Guitar/String Bass, Percussion

The Battle of Britain (BoB) 75th Commemoration Gala Dinner was taken placed at Royal Air Force (RAF) Northolt on 17th September 2015. The Gala Dinner included a Sunset Parade from the Queens Colour Squadron based at RAF Northolt and a Fly-past from the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF).

Contact us

What standard should you be?
To join the RAF as a musician you will need to have a minimum playing standard of ABRSM Grade 8 or equivalent.

Entry is by audition based upon the format of the Grade 8 examination. Entry level is determined at that audition; either Part-Qualified (the minimum standard acceptable), or Qualified (typically at college graduate/diploma standard).

Basic Recruit Training
Basic recruit training takes place over 10 weeks at RAF Halton in Buckinghamshire

Part-Qualified Entry
Salary – £19,634.52
After Basic Recruit Training, Part-Qualified Entrants will spend approximately 12 weeks at Headquarters Music Services. They will undertake further study on their instrument, learn band drill, and complete written projects prior to final assessment and posting to a band.

Qualified Entry
Salary – £25,272.24
After Basic Recruit Training, Qualified Entrants will spend approximately 4 weeks at Headquarters Music Services for Familiarization Training before their first posting.

Contract
The initial contract is for twelve years, but notice to leave can be given, subject to a qualifying period of service.

Eligibility
The upper age limit for musicians applying is 39 years on the day of attestation (the first day on Recruit Training). The lower age limit is 17 ½.
Further details on the RAF Recruitment Eligibility Check

If this has been helpful to you, please help us by clicking on our sponsor’s ads. It won’t cost you anything but we will get a few pence per click.

Much love and happy music making,

Roger Moisan







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